How do you foster the motivation for sharing?

Design Bash 8th July 09

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Gráinne Conole
8 July 2009

How do you foster the motivation for sharing? Should we adopt an egotistic, personal-benefit approach or a community-based, altruistic approach?

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Gráinne Conole
10:35am 8 July 2009


One idea that came up in the group today was to run some fun, engaging discussions in web 2.0 space.  For example a tweet asking people to say what their most memorable learning experience was, then capture these and somehow get people to comment on each others.

Rebecca Galley
10:40am 8 July 2009


Accessing people while they are excited about their designs and ideas is important. Sharing is an 'in the moment' thing - spontaneous and generous. Sharing is also cultural and teachers are used to designing their learning in a vacuum - sharing may make them feel vulnerable for a little while. On a personal note I think a community approach is the right thing and more aligned to philosophies I hold about teaching, learning and life.

Phillip
10:55am 8 July 2009


Grainne - re: "tweet asking people to say what their most memorable learning experience was, then capture these and somehow get people to comment on each others." We're trying a variant of that among the T&L community at UQ but using Ning as the discussion space.  We'll let you know how it plays out.

However, I think the real issue is what problem is web2.0 tools solving from the perspective of the mainstream faculty/academic staff.  If they don't perceive themselves having a challenge that social networking tools address, there is not much likelihood that such tools will have perceived value.

AJ Cann
11:49am 8 July 2009


I don't think you can discuss sharing without considering the Prisoner's Dilemma, which isn't wholly encouraging. In that light, the best way forward would seem to be to ensure that potential sharers view sharing as an iterated routine rather than a one-off. 

Gráinne Conole
11:59am 8 July 2009


@Phillip yes I agree and as we know you don't "get" social networking tools until you try them and more importantly until you become part of a community that is meaningful for you. I think we need to think of some clever ways to intice them into the space, to demonstrate to them the value. Not sure what those ways might be yet! Would be good for us to brainstorm!

Gráinne Conole
12:01pm 8 July 2009


@AJCann totally agree - we need it to become an inherent part of people's daily practice, so that they dont see it as an added hassle but something seemless in their practice that they do as routine AND that they see value in.

Giota Alevizou
12:15pm 8 July 2009


@Rebecca: "Sharing is also cultural and teachers are used to designing their learning in a vacuum". I tend to agree...I think there's an element of adaptability and adoption that is beyond altruism. Inscribed purpose is key. Maybe there can be also an aspect in LD that has to integrate peer-review focusing on support and feedback fostering both  creativity and in professional development.

Gráinne Conole
12:31pm 8 July 2009


@Giota @Rebecca whilst I agree with you that sharing is a cultural issue, I do think it is part of teachers inherent practice to share - ie the conversations teachers have during coffee breaks - "I did this great thing with my students yesterday...' - for me the trick is to mimic this, amplify it, harnessing web 2.0 tools and practice.

Rebecca Galley
12:41pm 8 July 2009


@Grainne@Giota I think teachers talk over coffee less and less (except maybe in schools where there is still a staffroom) and anyway discussions too often focus on moaning about students...too depressing. However, this means there is potentially a gap in teacher experience here...an opportunity to share success and challenges.

Rebecca Galley
12:43pm 8 July 2009


@AJCann What is the Prisoner's Dilemma?

AJ Cann
1:45pm 8 July 2009


Prisoner's Dilemma: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prisoner's_Dilemma

Will Reader
2:10pm 8 July 2009


Hi all

Found this via a tweet from mweller. Prisoner's dilemma research is certainly relevant as is a load of other psycho-ecomoic research on public good games (e.g. Ernst Fehr's word) and social psychology research on social loafing (e.g. classic work by Latane, et al). Bob Kraut at (I think) CMU has also conducted research on cooperation/sharing using on-line forums.

Ways of encouraging sharing/cooperation.

Increase social relationships among participants (foster friendships -- they are less likely to default on one another).

Increase shared interests among the group (your success is my success, etc. see classic psychology work on Robber's Cave)

Reduce anonymity

There are probably others too but that's all I can remember for now :)

Juliette Culver
2:45pm 8 July 2009


I think it's interesting to look at what motivates people to participate in open source communities, open street map, wikipedia and so on. Although there may be some personal benefit, there's something going on beyond that which isn't purely social I think. For me contributing to open street map certainly isn't social for example.

 

AJ Cann
4:11pm 8 July 2009


@Will does "Reduce anonymity" imply reward building an online identity?

Will Reader
5:05pm 8 July 2009


@AJ Cann I would say it is more about building a reputation online as someone who shares/cooperates. It doesn't really matter so much if your online identity is the same as your 'real' one (whatever that means!)  nor that you use your real name. I guess what matters is that your username is relatively stable over different interactions and (possibly) platforms so that your reputation (good or bad) goes with you.

@Juliette I suppose that status is a big driving force with opensource. Prestige-based status rather than dominance-based status: you gain status in your community by virtue of the quality of your contribution. I should have mentioned this one in my original list as its very important (perhaps preeminent). Again, it matters that you can be recognised as an individual to permit the development of a good reputation.

Will Reader
5:10pm 8 July 2009


@AJ Cann I would say it is more about building a reputation online as someone who shares/cooperates. It doesn't really matter so much if your online identity is the same as your 'real' one (whatever that means!)  nor that you use your real name. I guess what matters is that your username is relatively stable over different interactions and (possibly) platforms so that your reputation (good or bad) goes with you.

@Juliette I suppose that status is a big driving force with opensource. Prestige-based status rather than dominance-based status: you gain status in your community by virtue of the quality of your contribution. I should have mentioned this one in my original list as its very important (perhaps preeminent). Again, it matters that you can be recognised as an individual to permit the development of a good reputation.

Giota Alevizou
2:04pm 9 July 2009


 @Grainne@Rebecca It will be interesting to gather data about teacher's experience in this respect. From my experience and from what I have read in the literature I can say that there's both sharing and moaning (which can be therapeutic). 

Giota Alevizou
2:10pm 9 July 2009


@Julliette @Will adding to reputation, prestige and status there's a lot of ideas about self-improvement, ethical production, cultural citizenship...and the list grows at least in OS Open content contexts...Some aspects are relevant for learning environments. It may be interesting to explore not only motivation for sharing, but also 'sharing performance' i.e. competition, selective sharing, etc...perhaps this relates with another question  / cloud that I am about to set up: 'what are the barriers for sharing'?

June Lee
7:11am 3 August 2009


@Giota I wonder if teacher confidence level may be a concern~ sometimes a lack of confidence in the quality of one's own lesson materials and ideas may result in a reluctance to share them -- they're good enough for my own use, but I'm embarrassed about telling the whole world what I am doing, or to tell me what a lousy job I'm doing.

How do we encourage peers to be more open to criticism and embrace peer review as a culture? Just my two cents'. :)

 

Gráinne Conole
11:38am 3 August 2009


@June lee - I agree teachers lack of confidence over the designs is no doubt a key issue. But we somehow need to create a supportive culture where teachers feel its safe to share and where they get a benefit as a result of sharing. We are seeing this generally in web 2.0 practices just not totally yet for learning and teaching. For example I now on my blog will quite happily post a  half completed paper because I know that although its not perfect people will accept the state its in and because I get valubale feedback on how to improve that. I wouldnt have dreamed of doing that 5 years ago! So I have changed my practive over time as I have seen the benefits of sharing and as I have become more confident in web 2.0 spaces. 

Giota Alevizou
2:14pm 3 August 2009


@Grainne @June Lee I think there are degrees of sharing and chosing what to share and with whom even in informal Web 2 social networking sites (at least). There're are lot of issues of granularity and stratification in sharing, publicising adding to the issue of lacking confidence... let along the issue of privacy and concerns that go beyond peer review and suggestions into assessment (professional assessment, major reviews...). Perhaps if we were to 'translate' social networking and peer reviewing that would foster a supportive culture in a teaching and learning context, the issue of confidence over quality in relation to eponymous/anonymous contributions, levels of participation in relation to educational contexts...closed or more open disciplinary / teaching communities...  any thoughts?

Giota Alevizou
5:01pm 3 August 2009


It would be interesting in deploying concepts from Gofman's self-representation in participatory learning environments. Gofman has been used widely for analysis of blogs and for other forms of web 2.0 mediation including representation and youth learning. It's worth exploring that in fostering learning designs for teaching environments? Again self-representation has a double meaning or it is doubly articulated in relation a)identity; b) [political/cultural] representation...

root reference: Goffman, E. (1959). The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. Garden City, New York,
Doubleday Anchor.

Sukhtinder
2:21pm 7 September 2009 (Edited 2:22pm 7 September 2009)


Agree with you @Giota, there are personal and cultural boundaries that can affect sharing . We need to look at the nature and context of the environment that foster sharing. This can include scale of the audience; nature of topic discussed, risks involved and personal evaulation of 'what's in it' (investment) for the user.

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