Q&A: Andy Lane and Jan Hylen

Q: Considering OER content subject areas and types – what is most popular, what works...

Cloud created by:

Patrick McAndrew
20 April 2010

Q: Considering OER content subject areas and types – what is most popular, what works well?

A: Jan – European Schoolnet has considered this around sharing resources and have looked at what travels well across borders. Their findings include the more visual that text based, science over humanities. This data is at school level however.

A: Andy – surprisingly varied. E.g current top 10 includes law, Welsh history, polymer engineering. Reasons also vary – topicality, links to courses, promotion, regional difference. Also difficult to track use that does not happen on site.

A: Oxford iTunesU data – e.g. entrepeneurship material. Science Enterprise took off tremendously – but not for obvious reasons. Brought benefits to the Business School through open availability.

A: Visual approach has attracted many people and encouraged creativity.

Q: Sara from Strategic Content Alliance. Is the user generated content monitored in any way?

A: Andy – we do not do any monitoring. The split site approaches allows more experimental approach in LabSpace.

Q: Melissa Highton – are there examples of local initiatives that offered training and incentives?

A: Jan – not much to say on training. For incentives – he has heard that MIT staff have used the OER as a factor in demonstrating pedagogic skills in an open and measured way for salary negotiation.

A: Andy – The Open University has used the student feedback in courses for reward and recognition. OER provide another factor that is more transferable to campus-based intitutions.

Q: Sheila Webber from Sheffield. There are individual motivations for publishing OER rather than institutional. Particularly hard to motivate reuse.

Extra content

Embedded Content

Contribute

Contribute to the discussion

Please log in to post a comment. Register here if you haven't signed up yet.