Activity: Activity Planner

The Activity Planner (previously called the Pedagogy Profile) designed to help teachers (or learners) map different typs of...

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Rebecca Galley
21 April 2010

This is an experimental widget that has been developed by the OULDI and Course Business Models projects at the Open University. We would welcome feedback. The tool is designed to help teachers (or learners) map different typs of student activities across a course or sequence of learning events. The work derives from a learning activity taxonomy (Conole, 2007; Conole 2008) that characterises the types of tasks learners undertake into six types:

Pedagogy profile

  • Assimilative (attending to and understanding content),
  • Information handling (e.g. gathering and classifying resources or manipulating data),
  • Adaptive (use of modelling or simulation software),
  • Communicative (dialogic activities, e.g. pair dialogues or group-based discussions),
  • Productive (construction of an artefact such as a written essay, new chemical compound or a sculpture) and
  • Experiential (practising skills in a particular context or undertaking an investigation). 
  • In addition the tool looks at the spread of assessment acros the course or sequence of learning activiites.

Purpose

Use this exercise to visually map the activities that students will engage in through a unit, module or course, and get a working experience of what the graph might tell you about the spread of types of activities you have designed for.

What you need

  1. Activity (Pedagogy) profile widget 
  2. An activity, module or course to experiment with.

Task

Work out the percentage of time spent engaged in each kind of activity and use the widget to plot these.  Each row can represent a "unit of time" - so this might be a week, month or block. For each unit you then fill in the amount of time (say for example number of hours).  Fill in each of the cells in the matrix. Click "add' or 'delete' to vary the number of rows. Click update to see the completed profile. Profiles can be printed or saved as .jpegs and uploaded to Flickr (5mins for a short activity significantly longer for a whole course!)

Respond

Consider the following questions and add to the discussion below:

1. Who might be interested in seeing this view?

2. How useful might it be to compare your chart with other people's pedagogical profiles (you can do this with by embedding Flickr images of you charts below) What might this comparison tell you?

3. (For support teams) How might this graph help you talk to course teams about the resources, advice, activities and tools you have on offer?

4. When in the course design process do you think course teams could usefully complete this activity? (5 mins)

This activity format is based on the e-tivity format developed by the Adelie Project Team working on the Carpe Diem project.

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