Activity: 45 mins: Task Swimlane

This activity acts as an easy taster introduction to using CompendiumLD to map activities and...

Cloud created by:

Rebecca Galley
21 April 2010

This activity acts as an easy taster introduction to using CompendiumLD to map activities and units. We strongly recommend that after this taster activity you try out the real thing - watch the Getting Started with CompendiumLD SlideShow!

Key

Purpose

This activity will provide a very quick introduction to the CompendiumLD learning design tool and the Task Swimlane representation which maps an activity at the micro-level.

What you need

  1. A piece A3 paper
  2. A page of CompendiumLD node stickers. (See embedded .pdf doc below. This can be downloaded from SlideShare)
  3. An activity from your course or module to map out (real or scenario)
  4. Pens

Task

Define the learning outcome(s) that this activity expects to meet, the tools and resources you have decided to use, and your assessment strategy. Use the node stickers to map out your activity on the A3 paper. Decide yourself the best way to structure your activity map and use pens to make and explain links between nodes (5 mins for a simple activity).

As you are working, ask yourself design questions for example:  Who or what is at the centre of the activity? What is the pedagogical impact of the tools and resources chosen? How will students work together? What are you hoping will happen in the activity, and what are the challenges or barriers to achieving this? (35 mins)

 Respond

Consider the following questions and add to the discussion below:

  1. Who might be interested in seeing this activity view?
  2. How easy do you think it would be for someone else to understand your map? What could you add to your map, or how could you restructure it, to help them understand?
  3. (For support teams) How might a CompendiumLD map of an activity help you talk to course teams about the resources, advice, tools and activities your department offers?
  4. Where in the course design process do you think course teams could usefully build this view? (10mins)

This activity format is based on the e-tivity format developed by the Adelie Project Team working on the Carpe Diem project.

Extra content

Embedded Content

CompendiumLD Task Swimlane stickers

CompendiumLD Task Swimlane stickers

added by Rebecca Galley

Contribute

Daniel K. Schneider
5:17pm 18 May 2010


Hi,

Anyone got a good swim-lane example ? I am bit puzzled with respect to the matching of "normal" LD and Compendium nodes and the new sequence mapping nodes that came out with V 1.0

If I understand right, the idea is to put all or most of the mapping icons on top and then:

  1. Enter some text inside (optional)
  2. Align LD-OU nodes below.

Now:

  • Intent and challenges + what is to be learnt  (isnt' that the same ?) ==> learning outcome nodes
  • Media and tools ==> tools
  • Student ressources ==> resources (but now resources will have to be linked to tools in the LD-OU diagram ?)
  • Support roles (where is the learner ?) 

Etc. ... :)

Also, doesn't this "view" conflict with swim-lanes for roles à la UML activity diagram ?

- cheers ! - Daniel

PS: Made an quick update of my mostly french CompendiumLD intro ( http://edutechwiki.unige.ch/fr/Tutoriel_CompendiumLD ) ... and would like to see a canonical example before I start telling my own view about how to use these

 

Andrew Brasher
10:52am 19 May 2010


Hi Daniel

I think your interpretation is correct i.e.

put all or most of the sequence mapping icons on top and then:

  1. Enter some text inside (optional)
  2. Align LD-OU nodes below.

(I have added the word sequence for clarification)

The stencils in CompendiumLD should be regarded as prompts, and are not intended to impose rigid ways of designing.  The nodes in the sequence mapping stencil are intended to prompt users (i.e. learning designers) to think about different facets of the design, but it is not mandatory to use them all.  Indeed, in this example only the schedule marker is used to highlight the time dependent nature of the tasks being carried out by the students and those in supporting roles (i.e. teachers and 'controllers').

We've recently published a guide to the CompendiumLD node types and there's also a map showing an example of the swimlane headers in use which I hope  is helpful.

I guess from reading your CompendiumLD intro that you have already seen the guide to the node types, so I'll try to answer  some of the points you raise.

">Intent and challenges + what is to be learnt  (isnt' that the same ?) ==> learning outcome nodes"

The “Intents and challenges” lane is intended to be used to capture aspects of the design that the designer regards as potentially problematic. It could that this is the first time they’ve used a particular pedagogic approach, or a particular tool..

“What is to be learnt” should contain the learning outcomes, and “Learning output” is to record any manifestations of learner behaviour that can be used to evaluate what is intended to be learnt. Typically these “Learning output”s will be written essays or similar, but the could be observations of a learner’s behaviour e.g. a change in the learner’s approach to their work in their practice ( e.g. as a Doctor, or Social worker etc).

“Media and tools ==> tools”  The idea behind the “Media and tools” lane is to group the artefacts that a learner will interact with together.  

“Student ressources ==> resources (but now resources will have to be linked to tools in the LD-OU diagram ?)”  The intention behind this is to separate how concepts are delivered (which can be described using ‘Media nad tools’) with the semantic content. We’ve called this ‘’Student resources’ and may change  this title: any suggestions?

“Support roles (where is the learner ?) “ Support roles include the teacher and any others which support the learner. These could include other learners. The learner role occupies the “Student activity”lane.

I stress again that the stencils in CompendiumLD should be regarded as prompts, and are not intended to impose rigid ways of designing.  Feel free to adapt and use them in your own way. Please add  any examples to this cloud.

“Also, doesn't this "view" conflict with swim-lanes for roles à la UML activity diagram ?”

I don’t think so, but am happy to be corrected!

Great news to hear about the update to your mostly French intro to CompendiumLD. Did you know you can now try out translating one of the menus for CompendiumLD and running it in  e.g. French?

I hope I've provided enough information so that you can start to give your own view of how to use CompendiumLD. Please let us know how you get on!

Best wishes

Andrew

Daniel K. Schneider
11:28am 19 May 2010


Cool, that answers all my questions.

thanx Andrew !

"Student ressources" also could be named "learning ressources". I don't think it matters a lot. On the other hand I always found tricky the sometimes not so obvious separation of tool and content (in all LD languages). E.g. I use a wiki as one-in-all tool for two classes (learning materials, course plan and activity descriptions, forum, and writing-to-learn environment).

Btw. I started teaching CompendiumLD this year (i.e. as part of a designing a LAMS sequence exercise given to students in edutech) and the tool was well accepted. Your new version with these conceptual swimm lanes is a nice addition. The only major problem people seem to have with Compendium is the direction of arrows. But it probably doesn't matter much :)  My personal major problem with Compendium and LD in general is representing loops, e.g. in project-oriented teaching students typically have to go over a task three times or even more. Don't know how to do these in a proper way. I think using labels for arrows does help, but it can get messy as shown here (won't post it as design here, since I feel that it should be improved a bit ...)

Also, I will have look at localisation sometimes (as soon as I find time)

Andrew Brasher
12:06pm 19 May 2010


Good :-) & thanks for the suggestions

It's great to know about your use of CompendiumLD in teaching: could you post an example or a link to an example here?

With respect to your activity map, there is potential to improve the layout by using a "Go to". Right-click on a node, then select 'Create go to'. This will create a 'copy' of the selected node which can be placed anywhere on the smae map as the original: when you double-click the go-to the map focus shifts to the original node.  Nb - to create a copy in another map, use 'copy-paste special' .

However, I know that loops are a problem - again please post some examples that are particularly difficult and I will see what we can do.

The direction of the link arrows can be changed by right-clicking on the arrows, but perhaps I did not undertsand what yyou meant?

Andrew

Daniel K. Schneider
8:26pm 19 May 2010


Regarding arrows:

I was wondering about the semantics of the arrow direction. E.g. in your tutorial 2 map example (sorry didn't see that it included sequence mapping icons) you got the following:

  • task ---> tool (students consults and contributes to a wiki)
  • task <---> tools (students consults and contributes to a wiki)
  • task <-- tool (student contributes to an e-portfolio)

In other words: It's not always clear what the "source/origin" is, the task or the tool. I suggest that maybe in a future version you might replace the default labels for arrow types (which don't make sense) with something that does, like "read", "contribute", or whatever (of course this would need some thinking and discussions).

Regarding copies. Yes I have seen that one can have "goto" nodes, now that you tell me, but I wonder if this is wise thing to do, since the map is supposed to be an argument that ought to be easily readable by others as graph

 

Daniel K. Schneider
8:36pm 19 May 2010


Old XML format ?

Mhh I tried to retrieve designs from 4 students that they did last semester. I did ask them to submit XML files. Now in the Windows V1.0 version I just installed, this XML format is gone, but in the same Unix version I installed two days ago it's still there. Is this a mistake or on purpose or did something go wrong during the install ?

I also noticed that on Ubuntu the old "LD templates" are missing.Maybe the missing old stencil just remains in my windows Vista install because I installed V1.0 over V0.75.:)

 

 

Andrew Brasher
8:54am 20 May 2010


The import/export XML format should stil be available, but you have to view the full menu to see it. You do this by clicking on the little arrow at the end of the menu as shown in slides 17 & 18 in 'Doing more with CompediumLD' .

I guess that you may have clicked on the arrow in your Unix version inadvertently hence revelaing the XML options, but I could be wrong: let me know if the suggestion above works or not.

You are correct about the old templates. When I get a chance I wil make the old stencil available for download, but if you wnat to use it with v1.0 all you need to do is copy the stencil folder into \System\resources\Stencils then restart CompendiumLD.

Andrew

Andrew Brasher
8:56am 20 May 2010


Hi Daniel

I have just realised that I've missed an earlier message from you ('Regarding arrows'): bear with me, I'll reply to that later today.

Andrew

Daniel K. Schneider
11:22am 20 May 2010 (Edited 5:06pm 20 May 2010)


Sorry for not seeing the menu expansion. Indeed it does work. I'll try to think more before posting :(

Since I usually find stuff and I didn't you also may expect other users to miss these. So it's an ergonomics debate: Are these 2 level menus really necessary ? In most cases I think not, e.g. I really don't like the Microsoft "personalized menus" and find that it creates more problems than solving them.

Andrew Brasher
7:22pm 20 May 2010


In reply to your earlier posting i.e.

Regarding arrows:

I was wondering about the semantics of the arrow direction. E.g. in your tutorial 2 map example (sorry didn't see that it included sequence mapping icons) you got the following:

  • task ---> tool (students consults and contributes to a wiki)
  • task <---> tools (students consults and contributes to a wiki)
  • task <-- tool (student contributes to an e-portfolio)

In other words: It's not always clear what the "source/origin" is, the task or the tool. I suggest that maybe in a future version you might replace the default labels for arrow types (which don't make sense) with something that does, like "read", "contribute", or whatever (of course this would need some thinking and discussions).

That's a good suggestion. The default labels are inherited from Compendium's origins as a tool to visualise discussions and arguments, and as you observe these do not make much sense for learning activities. Creating a set of useful labels would need some thought, but there is existing work on the kind of labels required e.g. the task type taxonomies in Conole & Fil, 2005.

Regarding copies. Yes I have seen that one can have "goto" nodes, now that you tell me, but I wonder if this is wise thing to do, since the map is supposed to be an argument that ought to be easily readable by others as graph

I agree that using a 'goto' node is not always the best solution, but it can avoid visual clutter and still show that the node occurs elsewhere. However, I think this isanother aspect that needs more work, along with loops.

So it's an ergonomics debate: Are these 2 level menus really necessary ? In most cases I think not,....

The simplified menus were introduced following usability tests and comments from users. I can add an option to always display the full menu - I'll put that on my 'to do' list.

Daniel K. Schneider
12:06pm 21 May 2010


Just a last tiny suggestion with respect to the menus: since probably many people will use CompendiumLD without digging into the tutorials, you might consider changing the tooltip for "Export learning design" to say something like "Export selected nodes as CompendiumLD learning desing file". I personnaly don't care much for IMS/LD (since it doesn't seem to be able to take of the ground and still lacks an extension to define use of tools)  but some people might become confused between LD as concept and LD as the IMS thing.

More generally speaking, I suggest that you should have more and longer tooltips. I believe that this software is about the only design tool that is easy to use and should still become easier. (I probably had a look at most of them and most are difficult or impossible like MOT+) Most teachers (or students) I know won't really dig into your (fine) tutorials if they get some hands-on training before they use it. Even I did miss a thing or two despite being someone who does read ;)

Isabella Brown
10:09pm 14 June 2011


Hi

I am confused about where the extra elements on the notation sheets come from. There are sections include support roles etc and I cannot find them on CompendiumLD.

Isabella

Andrew Brasher
10:37am 20 June 2011


Hi Isabella

The notation sheets include icons from CompendiumLD's  'Sequence map' set which is described here http://compendiumld.open.ac.uk/documentation/version1.0/QuickRefGuides/stencilsAndNodes/#sequence.

You can open this in CompendiumLD via the 'Tools' menu, by selecting 'Open Stencil' and then 'Sequence mapping'.

There are a few other sets (or stencils) available via Tools\Open Stencil,  and more information about several of these is available at http://compendiumld.open.ac.uk/documentation/version1.0/QuickRefGuides/stencilsAndNodes/

Andrew

Isabella Brown
5:22pm 20 June 2011


Thanks Andrew. I had tried to open other toolbars but must have missed that they should be stencil instead.

Isabella

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