Workshop on Technology-Enhanced Formative Assessment (TEFA) 2010

The goal of this workshop is to develop the notion of technology-enhanced formative assessment...

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Marco Kalz
4 June 2010


The goal of this workshop is to develop the notion of technology-enhanced
formative assessment (TEFA) further, combining expertise from pedagogy,
educational measurement, cognitive science and information technology. The
workshop aims at promoting formative assessment and evaluation as a component
for extending existing or new technology-enhanced learning approaches.
Formative assessment has already demonstrated its positive impact on learning
in general, and helps the learner to achieve self-regulation skills. Furthermore,
learner models can provide valuable information for the adaptation of learning
resources and processes in the online learning environments of today.

If you have problems submitting your contribution to the workshop via this cloud, please send it to the main organizers.

Extra content

Combining Feedback and Assessment 

Conception of a software tool combining formative assessment and grading

Daniel Berger

Curtin Business School, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia

and, University of Technology, Graz, Austria

e-mail: daniel@berger-web.at

 

Heinz Dreher

Curtin Business School, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia

e-mail: h.dreher@curtin.edu.au

 

Christian Gütl

Curtin Business School, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia

and University of Technology, Graz, Austria

e-mail: cguetl@iicm.tugraz.at

 

Abstract — a very important part of the education process is the feedback learners get from their teachers and tutors. Sometimes the feedback is not adequate because the concentration of educators is on grading. In this paper the focus is on the development of the new software tool eAAM (electronic assignment assessment & moderation), which combines grading and formative assessment for different formats of assignments.

Keywords-formative assessment; feedback; e-assessment; grading; summative assessment

 

2 page description available at:

http://eaglesemantics.com/webfm_send/12

 

Heinz Dreher
13:54 on 27 June 2010 (Edited 13:58 on 27 June 2010)

Empowering users with a lightweight Peer Feedback Tool
Barbara Wasson* & Vibeke Vold**
*Department of Information Science, University of Bergen
**UniDigital, UniResearch
barbara.wasson@uib.no; vibeke.vold@uni.no

 

 

Barbara Wasson
16:59 on 27 June 2010

Empowering users with a lightweight Peer Feedback Tool
Barbara Wasson* & Vibeke Vold**
*Department of Information Science, University of Bergen
**UniDigital, UniResearch
barbara.wasson@uib.no; vibeke.vold@uni.no

 

In this position statement we address the issue:

What is required to empower the users (students, peers, teachers, parents, employers) to make best use of Technology Enhanced Formative Assessment (TEFA) in order to guide learning?

Peer assessment is an important component of a participatory culture of learning (Kollar & Fischer, 2010) and an important component in the design of learning environments implementing this contemporary culture of learning. Fadel, Honey, and Pasnik (2007) argue that as we have moved towards more participatory culture, such as collaborative learning and knowledge building, new methods of assessment are required.  In our work we are focused on providing “playful” peer assessment possibilities in a science learning environment. Peer assessment empowers students and peers by enabling students to take charge of their learning, and become active learners who take responsibility for, and manage, their own learning (Black, Harrison, Lee, Marshall & William, 2002; Boud, 1995; Dochy et al., 1999; Topping, 2003; Yang, Badger, & Yu, 2006). For example, it enables students to learn to assess and to develop assessment skills, either when they enact peer assessment themselves or when receiving an assessment from their peers, and at the same time, it enhances students’ learning through knowledge diffusion and exchange of ideas, even when they are incorrect.

We believe that peer feedback, a form of formative peer assessment, needs to be lightweight, easy to use, and seamlessly integrated into the learning process. We are inspired by interaction mechanisms in participatory communities such as digit.no (photography site).  Our ideas are being implemented in the European 7th framework integrated project SCY (Science Created by You; www.scy-net.eu). SCY takes an approach to learning where student developed artefacts are central (de Jong et al., forthcoming). During a SCY mission learners gather and process information, design and conduct experiments, make interpretations and abstraction, and communicate their conclusions; in other words they have to engage in processes of active learning, based on inquiry, knowledge building, and learning by design.   For example, students embark on a mission such as “Design a CO2 friendly house” and through inquiry learning activities supported by resources, tools and scaffolds embedded in SCY-LAB (the SCY learning environment) create a number of ELOs (Emerging Learning Objects to complete the mission. The collection of ELOs developed during the mission represents the acquired knowledge and skill of the student. Thus, in our approach to assessment (Vold, Wasson & de Jong, forthcoming) these ELOs are central. ELOs placed in the SCYePortfolio form the basis of summative evaluation to be carried out by teachers after the mission is completed, while peers provide formative assessment, through a specially designed tool, during the mission. In this workshop we are interested in discussing our approach to peer assessment and describe the design of SCYFeedback, a tool that will be used for “playful” peer feedback during the learning process. We refer to this as “playful” as we aim to provide a tool that will entice and motivate students to give and receive feedback on the ELOs they create, thus empowering them during the learning process. 

In summary, our perspective on and approach to empowering students and peers is inspired by:

  • an increasing view of learning as a participative activity (Kollar & Fischer, 2009)
  • feedback, as an integral part of the students’ learning process, has the potential to make the process more productive (Dysthe, Lillejord, Wasson, & Vines, 2009).
  • the recognition that peer assessment can motivate students to engage in the learning process (Sluijsmans, et al. 2002)
  • Ronen and Langley (2004) who point to the benefits of peer assessment when students are provided the opportunity to learn from artefacts created by their peers,
  • Falchikov (2003) who shows how peer assessment assists students to create higher quality artefacts,
  • the recognition that many people (students included) take part in participatory worlds that offer interaction among the participants around a common interest
  • research that indicates that formal instructional intervention asking students to reflect on feedback from peers does not significantly increase learning gains (
  • students are more willing to accept feedback given in “student-speak” (Frost and Turner, 2005)  
  • an interest in trying “something new, lightweight and motivating” within the field of peer assessment utilising the benefits of using a lightweight Web 2.0 tool

 

SCYFeedback will be tested during the upcoming field trials in the SCY project. Important research questions will be: Are students empowered during the learning process by using SCYFeedback? When do the students use the SCYFeedback tool? Is this form of playful peer assessment motivating? Is feedback actually provided? What other items could be added to the tool? For example, a means of rating whether or not the feedback was useful could also be added to the playful peer assessment tool. Peer assessment data, including observations, video, data logs, screen shots and ELOs, collected from this field trial will be analysed to determine how much the tool is used, how it is used, the content of the peer feedback and its impact on the learning process. Only after this analysis will we be able to say anything conclusive about this approach to peer feedback.

 

References

Black, P., Harrison, C., Lee, C., Marshall, B., & Wiliam, D. (2002). Working Inside the Black Box,  assessment for learning in the classroom. Kings College: London.

Boud, D. (1995). Enhancing learning through self-assessment. London: Kogan Page.

de Jong, T. et al. (forthcoming). Learning by creating and exchanging objects: the SCY experience. British Journal of EducationalTechnology.

Dochy, F., Segers, M., & Sluijsmans, D. (1999). The use of self-, peer-, and co-assessment in higher education: A review. Studies in Higher Education, 24, 331–350.

Dysthe, O., Lillejord, S., Wasson, B. & Vines, A. (2009). Productive E-Feedback in Higher Education: Two Models and Some Critical Issues. In S. Ludvigsen & Saljo, R. (Eds.) Learning Across Sites. EARLI Learning Series. Routledge.

Fadel, C., Honey, M., & Pasnik, S. (May 18, 2007). Assessment in the Age of Innovation. Education Week. Retrieved from http://www.edweek.org/login.html

Falchikov, N. (2003). Involving students in assessment. Psychology Learning and Teaching, 3, 102-108.

Frost, J. & Turner, T. (Eds.) (2005) Learning to Teach Science in the Secondary School, Second Edition. Routledge Falmer, London.

Kollar, I. & Fischer, F. (forthcoming). Commentary: peer assessment as collaborative learning: a cognitive perspective. Learning and Instruction.

Ronen, M., & Langley, D. (2004). Scaffolding complex tasks by open online submission: Emerging patterns and profiles. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 8, 39-61.

Sluijsmans, D. M. A., Brand-Gruwel, S., & van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2002). Peer assessment training in teacher education: Effects on performance and perceptions. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 27, 443–454.

Topping, K. (2003). Self and peer assessment in school and university: Reliability, validity and utility. In M. Segers, F. Dochy, & E. Cascallar (Eds.), Optimizing new modes of assessment: In search of qualities and standards. Dordrecht/Boston/London: Kluwer Academic Publish

Van Zundert, M., Sluijsmans, D. M. A., & Van Meeriënboer, J. J. G. (2010). Effective peer assessment processes: research findings and future directions. Learning and Instruction, (2009), doi:10.1016/j.learninstruc.2009.08.004.

Yang, M., Badger, R., & Yu, Z. (2006). A comparative study of peer and teacher feedback in a Chinese EFL writing class. Journal of Second Language Writing, 15, 179-200.

Vold, Wasson & de Jong, forthcoming Digital Assessments of 21st Century Skills ‘Orchestrating Inquiry Learning', Routledge’s new ‘Psychology in Education’ book series.

Barbara Wasson
17:00 on 27 June 2010

Embedded Content

Contribute

Patricia
3:59pm 25 June 2010 (Edited 7:45pm 25 June 2010)


Dear all,

here you can find my contribution for the TEFA workshop (http://193.145.50.210:8080/QTIS/video/video-TEFA-web.html)

We present the tool QuesTInSITU a formative assessment tool to collaboratively create webmap-tests.

Authors: Patricia Santos, Mar Pérez-Sanagustín, David Pérez, Davinia Hernández-Leo & Josep Blat.
emails: {patricia.santos;mar.perez;davinia.hernandez;josep.blat}@upf.edu & davidperezcalle@gmail.com
Afiliation:GTI group, DTIC, UPF Barcelona (Spain)

 

Patricia Santos

Dominique
1:36pm 29 June 2010 (Edited 2:07pm 29 June 2010)


This is the link to my submission for the workshop: 

http://www.box.net/shared/mer4yk6mtz

Dominique Verpoorten (Open University in the Netherlands)

D Bacigalupo
12:19pm 1 July 2010


 

Dear All,
Please find my submission to the workshop at:
http://users.ecs.soton.ac.uk/db1f08/tefa2010/
The details are as follows.
Formative Assessment the EASiHE way: Position Statement for Workshop
on Technology-Enhanced Formative Assessment (TEFA) 2010
David Bacigalupo, Bill Warburton, Lester Gilbert, Gary Wills
School of Electronics and Computer Science and iSolutions, University
of Southampton UK
Submission type: Powerpoint slides (with audio stream) i.e. Video in swf format
Formats: PDF and swf screencast with audio in three parts
The "case studies" slide lists the five workshop themes and research
questions we are addressing.

Dear All,

Please find our submission to the workshop at:

http://users.ecs.soton.ac.uk/db1f08/tefa2010/

Project website: http://easihe.ecs.soton.ac.uk

The details are as follows.

Formative Assessment the EASiHE way: Position Statement for Workshop on Technology-Enhanced Formative Assessment (TEFA) 2010

David Bacigalupo, Bill Warburton, Lester Gilbert, Gary Wills

School of Electronics and Computer Science and iSolutions, University of Southampton UK

Submission type: Powerpoint slides (with audio stream) i.e. Video in swf format

Formats: PDF and swf screencast with audio in three parts

The "case studies" slide lists the five workshop themes and research questions we are addressing.

 

Susan Bull
10:08pm 2 July 2010


Title: A Role for Open Learner Models in Formative Assessment: Support from Studies with Editable Learner Models

Authors: Norasnita Ahmad, Mark Britland, Susan Bull and Andrew Mabbott

Affiliation: University of Birmingham, UK

Contribution is available at: http://www.eee.bham.ac.uk/bull/papers-pdf/ECTEL10-WS-edit.pdf

Hélène Mayer
7:25am 8 July 2010


Dear All,

Please find our submission to the workshop at:

http://www.box.net/shared/afvv1mtrkv

Title : An overview of competencies by using a self and skills-assessment

Author : Hélène Mayer

Affiliation : Public Research Center Henri Tudor - Luxembourg

Greetings,
Hélène Mayer

 

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