Panel - Community College Panel on Open Education Innovation and Collaboration

16 April 2012

Community Colleges are embracing open educational practices to support innovation and collaboration and expand student

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Gabi Witthaus
17 April 2012

Very rough notes taken during session follow :-)

Cable Green, Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons
Una Daly, Community College Outreach Manager, Open Courseware Consortium and part-time faculty at Foothill Community College
James Glapa-Grossklag, Dean, Educational Technology, Learning Resources, & Distance Learning at College of the Canyons and President, CCCOER advisory board
Jean Runyon, Dean of Virtual Campus, Anne Arundel Community College and Co-Principal Investigator of Bridge-2-Success Next Generation Learning Learning Challenge funded project
Dr. Nancy Pawlyshyn, Chief Assessment Officer in Academic Affairs, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NY
Dr. Braddlee, Dean of Libraries, Academic Technology and Online Learning, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NYThe panel:The
The Panel:
  • Cable Green, Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons
  • Una Daly, Community College Outreach Manager, Open Courseware Consortium and part-time faculty at Foothill Community College
  • James Glapa-Grossklag, Dean, Educational Technology, Learning Resources, & Distance Learning at College of the Canyons and President, CCCOER advisory board
  • Jean Runyon, Dean of Virtual Campus, Anne Arundel Community College and Co-Principal Investigator of Bridge-2-Success Next Generation Learning Learning Challenge funded project
  • Dr. Nancy Pawlyshyn, Chief Assessment Officer in Academic Affairs, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NY
  • Dr. Braddlee, Dean of Libraries, Academic Technology and Online Learning, Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NY

 

Una Daly - Community Colleges in the USA:

CCOER mission - to promote adoption of OER to enhance teaching and learning.

CCOER priorities - educational outreach, document impact of OER, promote integration of OER into Community College Curricula.

James Glapa Grossklag: Colloege of the Canyons

Preparing students to go out and join the workforce in vocational education. About 15% of the students take online courses. Faculty create their own curriculum and do their own tech support. James: "We wanted to kickstart OER awareness in a way that would not be perceived as a burden for faculty. The idea of faculty writing coursebooks was daunting." 

Our students can't afford all their textbooks. Grant was given to create "playlists". This was less daunting for faculty than saying write your own textbook. 

What is a playlist?

Introductory text, learning unit, outcomes, objectives etc (course outline) -> website with text/ articles -> Transition text -> Media -> Transition Text...

Jean Runyon (Anne Arundel College, Maryland)

+-50,000 students come here every year. Some come out of high school and want to transfer to a four-year institution after studying with us. Others are coming back to us after many years out of school. Some come for kids college during the summer, or short courses on jewellery-making. Want more students to be more successful. Many of these students come under-prepared, and they don't complete their degrees or certificates.

Partnering with University of Maryland College (UMUC). Many of the college students transfer there. Also worked with MIT and OU (UK). The OU helps students have a gentle transition to the College environment. Next Generation grant enabled this collaboration. Bridge to Success.

Developed two courses:

  • Learning to Learn (L2L)
  • Succeed with M (SWiM)

All materials are open, discoverable and standards-based. Content is high quality and has been reused and adapted in a variety of ways. Refining the material though research being conducted by OU. 

Dr Nancy Pawlyshyn and Dr Bradddlee - Project Kaleidoscope

Mercy College is a private college but its mission is aligned with the community colleges. The lowest priced private institution in the State of New York. In a consortium with the community colleges.

Goals: Can we use OERs to increase participation and retention? And can we use technology to improve our outcomes? And can this be done at scale?

8 insittutions came together in May; then went off for the summer to develop courses by September. Some institutions took the lead in creating the materials; other institutions received the materials and used them in their courses. The key was modular design. This was critical to the success becasue it allowed the faculty to adapt around their institutions. These were not being launched as new materials, just keeping the same outcomes and bringing new materials in.

Why it's been successful:

This has been an emergent design. The leaders of the consortium were very responsive. Partners were all over the world in different time zones. Driven by student outcomes. Embedding the outcomes into the learning design.

Student retention shot up; their satisfaction shot up in every school. We could see that it worked right away. Cross-institutional collaboration was key. 

Guiding principles: Creat collaboration potential and step away:

Cable Green, Director GLobal Learning at Creative Commons

Washington State Open Course Library: https://sites.google.com/a/sbctc.edu/opencourselibrary/

Put in place the SBCTC Technology Plan (http://www.sbctc.edu/general/a_strategictechplan.aspx) - the strategic aim was to move from "Not invented here" to "Proudly borrowed from..."

Gates Foundation funded half of the General Education curriculum; Washington State funded the other half. Faculty were all behind it as long as no content was made mandatory.

Design teams were instructed to produce course materials that would not exceed $30. Support was provided (instructional design teams etc). Their peers selected them, e.g. Biology Professors selected the Biology professors to be on the design team. The last 40 courses (out of 81) are being built now. Saylor Foundation is taking the open libaray courses now, ripping them apart and putting them up on the Saylor website, which is a very nice format - just html. 

Next step - money to the colleges flows through this policy agency called the State Board. Voted on unanimously by all stakeholders. All optional grants that flow through that Board (tens of millions of dollars) now have to have CC licences. 

Everyone who worked on this had to agree to use what they built. (You have to eat your own dogfood.) 

Numbers: We spent 1.2 million USD (all stipend money and a bit of travel money for a kick-off conference. 100 people, 15,000 USD each.) Small amounts of money. None of the textbooks could cost more than 30 USD. The faculty - the savings for just their students in one year was upwards of $1.7 million.

Reality in American Comunity Colleges is that Adjunct faculty get about two weeks' prep time before they start teaching. They get no support. Now they are given an open library course (e.g. Sociology 101) to use if they want to. It's optional and they are welcome to modify it if they want to. So adjunct faculty are pleased (less preparation required) and students are pleased (low cost of 

Main repository where the State board is putting the stuff is Connexions. It's free, it's got versioning, and Connexions require that everything that goes in their is CC-By. Washington State asks everyone to put their improved versions back their with a new version number so it can be tracked.

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