About Dabas

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Chris High
13 August 2012

Dabas is a town south of Budapest in the Great Hungarian Plain.  We have good contacts there with local development initiatives through Judit Racz, who is helping to organise the PT camp.

You can get to Dabas from the airport by taking an airport minibus (sharing a ride will make this a reasonably priced alternative).  Alternately you can get there by public transport - details from Judit to follow.

We're working at the STRAND hostel: map

The hostel has 4 dormitories with 4 beds in each. Not everyone will be staying there, as some participants are local and some others have opted to get hotel rooms nearby.  There is space there for workshops and it will be our main base of operations.  We will also be out and about in Dabas part of the time and might need to hold one or two workshops at the local community development organisation office to ensure we have good internet connection.

Hostel photos

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Location PDF Print E-mail

Our region, though often overshadowed by the importance of the capital, can offer a number of interesting traveling, sightseeing, and recreational opportunities. The two most significant towns in our region are Dabas and Ocsa, which have maintained their regional cultural, political, and economic significance for centuries.


Dabas

Dabas is first mentioned in 1264 in Hungarian legal documents. Back then the town  was described as the residence of the royal drummers. The town gained greater economic and politicali importance in the 17-1800s. The historical residences you see in town at present were built by gentry families who had made their fortunes selling corn during the Napoleonic Wars at the turn of the 18-19th centuries. The buildings remaining from this era reflect not only the wealth of the town's residents but also their involvement in the country's tumultuous political life.
The Baroque style Calvinist Church (Bajcsy-zs. u. 8.) houses the porcelain wreath Lajos Kossuth ( revered national hero of the Hungarian National Revolution of 1948-49) sent for his father’s grave in 1880 from exile in Turin, Italy. In the church yard you can find a few classic gravestones rescued from the cemetery in Alsódabas. 
The late Baroque style Kossuth House can be found only a few blocks down from the church (Kossuth u. 19.). The inscription on the plaque reads: “This house was the residence of László Kossuth, Lajos Kossuth’s father, who died on 13th June 1839.” After the arrest of Lajos Kossuth, his aged father managed to escape to Dabas (1837) aided and abetted by Miklós Wesselényi. His grave can be found in the Calvinist cemetery.
The main street of Dabas connects three formerly separate villages into a vibrant and culturally diverse city. This street was always an important artery of the town’s economic life. This is where you can find, among the numerous historic mansions of Dabas nobility, the Kossuth Cultural Centre (Szent István u. 58.), which was built as the center of local entertainment. Named the Kaszino, this was one of the first such buildings and institutions in Hungary. 

Judit Racz
07:26 on 3 September 2012

Location PDF Print E-mail

Our region, though often overshadowed by the importance of the capital, can offer a number of interesting traveling, sightseeing, and recreational opportunities. The two most significant towns in our region are Dabas and Ocsa, which have maintained their regional cultural, political, and economic significance for centuries.


Dabas

Dabas is first mentioned in 1264 in Hungarian legal documents. Back then the town  was described as the residence of the royal drummers. The town gained greater economic and politicali importance in the 17-1800s. The historical residences you see in town at present were built by gentry families who had made their fortunes selling corn during the Napoleonic Wars at the turn of the 18-19th centuries. The buildings remaining from this era reflect not only the wealth of the town's residents but also their involvement in the country's tumultuous political life.
The Baroque style Calvinist Church (Bajcsy-zs. u. 8.) houses the porcelain wreath Lajos Kossuth ( revered national hero of the Hungarian National Revolution of 1948-49) sent for his father’s grave in 1880 from exile in Turin, Italy. In the church yard you can find a few classic gravestones rescued from the cemetery in Alsódabas. 
The late Baroque style Kossuth House can be found only a few blocks down from the church (Kossuth u. 19.). The inscription on the plaque reads: “This house was the residence of László Kossuth, Lajos Kossuth’s father, who died on 13th June 1839.” After the arrest of Lajos Kossuth, his aged father managed to escape to Dabas (1837) aided and abetted by Miklós Wesselényi. His grave can be found in the Calvinist cemetery.
The main street of Dabas connects three formerly separate villages into a vibrant and culturally diverse city. This street was always an important artery of the town’s economic life. This is where you can find, among the numerous historic mansions of Dabas nobility, the Kossuth Cultural Centre (Szent István u. 58.), which was built as the center of local entertainment. Named the Kaszino, this was one of the first such buildings and institutions in Hungary. 

Judit Racz
07:26 on 3 September 2012

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Judit Racz
7:29am 3 September 2012


Location PDF Print E-mail

Our region, though often overshadowed by the importance of the capital, can offer a number of interesting traveling, sightseeing, and recreational opportunities. The two most significant towns in our region are Dabas and Ocsa, which have maintained their regional cultural, political, and economic significance for centuries.


Dabas

Dabas is first mentioned in 1264 in Hungarian legal documents. Back then the town  was described as the residence of the royal drummers. The town gained greater economic and politicali importance in the 17-1800s. The historical residences you see in town at present were built by gentry families who had made their fortunes selling corn during the Napoleonic Wars at the turn of the 18-19th centuries. The buildings remaining from this era reflect not only the wealth of the town's residents but also their involvement in the country's tumultuous political life.
The Baroque style Calvinist Church (Bajcsy-zs. u. 8.) houses the porcelain wreath Lajos Kossuth ( revered national hero of the Hungarian National Revolution of 1948-49) sent for his father’s grave in 1880 from exile in Turin, Italy. In the church yard you can find a few classic gravestones rescued from the cemetery in Alsódabas. 
The late Baroque style Kossuth House can be found only a few blocks down from the church (Kossuth u. 19.). The inscription on the plaque reads: “This house was the residence of László Kossuth, Lajos Kossuth’s father, who died on 13th June 1839.” After the arrest of Lajos Kossuth, his aged father managed to escape to Dabas (1837) aided and abetted by Miklós Wesselényi. His grave can be found in the Calvinist cemetery. The main street of Dabas connects three formerly separate villages into a vibrant and culturally diverse city. This street was always an important artery of the town’s economic life. This is where you can find, among the numerous historic mansions of Dabas nobility, the Kossuth Cultural Centre (Szent István u. 58.), which was built as the center of local entertainment. Named the Kaszino, this was one of the first such buildings and institutions in Hungary. 

Judit Racz
7:29am 3 September 2012 (Edited 7:31am 3 September 2012)


Judit Racz
7:29am 3 September 2012


Location PDF Print E-mail

Our region, though often overshadowed by the importance of the capital, can offer a number of interesting traveling, sightseeing, and recreational opportunities. The two most significant towns in our region are Dabas and Ocsa, which have maintained their regional cultural, political, and economic significance for centuries.


Dabas

Dabas is first mentioned in 1264 in Hungarian legal documents. Back then the town  was described as the residence of the royal drummers. The town gained greater economic and politicali importance in the 17-1800s. The historical residences you see in town at present were built by gentry families who had made their fortunes selling corn during the Napoleonic Wars at the turn of the 18-19th centuries. The buildings remaining from this era reflect not only the wealth of the town's residents but also their involvement in the country's tumultuous political life.
The Baroque style Calvinist Church (Bajcsy-zs. u. 8.) houses the porcelain wreath Lajos Kossuth ( revered national hero of the Hungarian National Revolution of 1948-49) sent for his father’s grave in 1880 from exile in Turin, Italy. In the church yard you can find a few classic gravestones rescued from the cemetery in Alsódabas. 
The late Baroque style Kossuth House can be found only a few blocks down from the church (Kossuth u. 19.). The inscription on the plaque reads: “This house was the residence of László Kossuth, Lajos Kossuth’s father, who died on 13th June 1839.” After the arrest of Lajos Kossuth, his aged father managed to escape to Dabas (1837) aided and abetted by Miklós Wesselényi. His grave can be found in the Calvinist cemetery. The main street of Dabas connects three formerly separate villages into a vibrant and culturally diverse city. This street was always an important artery of the town’s economic life. This is where you can find, among the numerous historic mansions of Dabas nobility, the Kossuth Cultural Centre (Szent István u. 58.), which was built as the center of local entertainment. Named the Kaszino, this was one of the first such buildings and institutions in Hungary. 

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