Learning Design for Learning Design (HE): Clare's Scenario #3

Planning the big picture using learning design visualization tools

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Clare Gormley
20 January 2013

This is a start on another potential scenario/persona involving a new online course developer called "Joan". Note that this is based on the ideal scenario! :

Joan (40) lives in Dublin. She is a busy mother-of-two who has recently achieved a Computer Science doctorate and is doing a small amount of part-time lecturing. Her reputation as an enthusiastic & impressive lecturer precedes her so she has been approached to develop online learning materials for an online programme which has been running at her institution for some years. She knows there’s been a lot going on in educational technology recently but she hasn’t had time to investigate as much as she would like. She figures that becoming an online course developer would be an opportunity to learn more about online learning and might help advance her career. Truth be told, she is also pleased at the prospect of earning some extra money which will help pay off some of the debt incurred during her studies. 

After she has signed the contract, Joan shortly receives an email from Patricia, the programme’s instructional designer, pointing her to a series of tutorials that introduce important Instructional Design theories and practices. She is asked to complete these tutorials & associated exercises before a forthcoming Design & Development workshop. Being very diligent and motivated, Joan does exactly as requested! As she digests these tutorials, she realises that there’s more to online learning than she originally thought...for example, she realises that she didn’t really know what instructional design was about, she hadn’t really thought about the importance of promoting learner interaction online, and she had no idea so many new free tools were emerging that could be applied in education. This is bigger than she thought and she thinks she will have to tightly manage her time to meet the challenges ahead.

Two weeks later, at a Design & Development workshop, Joan participates in a lively discussion on potential tools & technologies for online learning. She then works alongside a fellow online course developer, Peter, on a design-related activity specially created for new eLearning designers. During this activity, she explores design visualization tools that are new to her and then begins to sketch out an initial design incorporating a variety of instructional media. She shares this draft design with her developer colleagues and the other members of the project team, seeking feedback and suggestions for improvement which she subsequently considers and implements. The resulting storyboard provides a blueprint for a design that Joan refines further over the weeks ahead, as time allows. 

 

Actors: Joan is a busy mother-of-two who has recently achieved a Computer Science doctorate and is currently working as a part-time lecturer. Her reputation as an enthusiastic lecturer precedes her so she has been approached to develop learning materials for an online Master’s programme which has been running at her institution for some years. She has just signed a contract to develop her first online module and is excited at the prospect of what she will learn. Although she has never developed learning for online delivery previously, she is willing to give it a go and is ready to start work in a month’s time. The extra stipend she will receive for performing this work is also attractive in the current financial climate.
For the duration of the project, Joan will work with a project team including a part-time instructional designer who will provide feedback on drafts and a senior academic who will advise on required content and provide additional subject matter expertise.
Goals: 
Joan wants to fulfill the requirements of her contract and develop a module that meets the needs of the project team as quickly as possible. She is also keen to learn approaches that she can potentially apply to current and future classroom teaching.
The senior academic wants to ensure that the learning meets agreed module learning aims and outcomes.
The instructional designer is keen to ensure that the learning materials & experiences created are instructionally sound and are engaging for learners.
The programme coordinator wants the project to be delivered on time to a high standard.

Extra content

Here is some extra detail around the scenario outlined above:

1) Brainstorm components of your scenario
Actors/Personas Involved: 
 
Joan, a part-time lecturer and busy mother-of-two who is about to design & develop her first module for an online Masters programme.
Patricia, a part-time instructional designer who is keen to ensure that the learning materials & experiences created for the programme are instructionally sound and are engaging for learners.
Joseph, a senior academic who will be reviewing Patricia’s work for technical accuracy primarily
Alison, a programme coordinator who wants the project to be delivered on time & to a high standard so that the programme attracts strong numbers into the future
Greg, a former software developer for a large multinational who has decided to take his first foray into online learning and has signed up for the above online Masters degree.
Susan, a course facilitator for the newly developed module who works closely with students studying online.
Peter, another online course developer who has some course facilitation experience
Goals (focus on Joan, the target learner of this design): 
Joan wants to fulfill the requirements of her contract and design an online module that meets the needs of the project team as quickly as possible. She is also keen to learn about approaches that she can potentially apply to current and future classroom teaching.
Settings: Joan is generally available to learn in the evenings, after the kids have gone to bed. She has also agreed to attend a new two-day design & development workshop at her commissioning institution. There she will meet other course developers who have been engaged for similar eLearning projects and will experience and learn about the design process for online materials. 
Objects: Laptop, email, instructional design tutorials, design representation tools & outputs (storyboard?)
Actions:  Joan receives an email pointing her to the instructional design tutorials. She takes them, digests them, does the exercises, explores some of the tools mentioned (eg wikis), and takes notes. Two weeks later she attends the Design & Development workshop.
Events: At the workshop, Joan works with a fellow online course developer on a design-related activity specially devised for new eLearning designers. She explores learning design visualization tools and begins to sketch out an initial course design. 
Results: By the end of the workshop, Joan creates a draft storyboard that shows great promise for integrating a variety of instructional strategies and media in a pedagogically-driven way. She shares the storyboard with the project team, gets their feedback, and plans to use her design as a blueprint for development.
Your design: The activity/resource we are designing will help ensure that Joan gets off to a good start with her project. It will allow her to visualize and share her design ideas and has given her plenty of food for thought for her face-to-face teaching also. 
2) Develop a narrative scenario/s: 
Planning the big picture using learning design visualization tools
Note that this is based on the ideal scenario!
Joan (40) lives in Dublin. She is a busy mother-of-two who has recently achieved a Computer Science doctorate and is doing a small amount of part-time lecturing. Her reputation as an enthusiastic & impressive lecturer precedes her so she has been approached to develop online learning materials for an online programme which has been running at her institution for some years. She knows there’s been a lot going on in educational technology recently but she hasn’t had time to investigate as much as she would like. She figures that becoming an online course developer would be an opportunity to learn more about online learning and might help advance her career. Truth be told, she is also pleased at the prospect of earning some extra money which will help pay off some of the debt incurred during her studies. 
After she has signed the contract, Joan shortly receives an email from Patricia, the programme’s instructional designer, pointing her to a series of tutorials that introduce important Instructional Design theories and practices. She is asked to complete these tutorials & associated exercises before a forthcoming Design & Development workshop. Being very diligent and motivated, Joan does exactly as requested! As she digests these tutorials, she realises that there’s more to online learning than she originally thought...for example, she realises that she didn’t really know what instructional design was about, she hadn’t really thought about the importance of promoting learner interaction online, and she had no idea so many new free tools were emerging that could be applied in education. This is bigger than she thought and she thinks she will have to tightly manage her time to meet the challenges ahead.
Two weeks later, at a Design & Development workshop, Joan participates in a lively discussion on potential tools & technologies for online learning. She then works alongside a fellow online course developer, Peter, on a design-related activity specially created for new eLearning designers. During this activity, she explores design visualization tools that are new to her and then begins to sketch out an initial design incorporating a variety of instructional media. She shares this draft design with her developer colleagues and the other members of the project team, seeking feedback and suggestions for improvement which she subsequently considers and implements. The resulting storyboard provides a blueprint for a design that Joan refines further over the weeks ahead, as time allows. 
3) Scrutinize your scenario & revise as necessary
I’m claiming (or perhaps assuming?) that:
Joan will take the pre-workshop tutorials and will attend the Design & Development workshop
Joan is interested in learning about effective online learning design
The prerequisite instructional design tutorials will provide an effective introduction to important ID theory and practice, and will raise her awareness of potential educational tools
The learning design visualization tools will be user friendly and helpful to Joan as someone who is new to designing learning

Actors/Personas Involved: 

  • Joan, a part-time lecturer and busy mother-of-two who is about to design & develop her first module for an online Masters programme.
  • Patricia, a part-time instructional designer who is keen to ensure that the learning materials & experiences created for the programme are instructionally sound and are engaging for learners.
  • Joseph, a senior academic who will be reviewing Patricia’s work for technical accuracy primarily
  • Alison, a programme coordinator who wants the project to be delivered on time & to a high standard so that the programme attracts strong numbers into the future
  • Greg, a former software developer for a large multinational who has decided to take his first foray into online learning and has signed up for the above online Masters degree.
  • Susan, a course facilitator for the newly developed module who works closely with students studying online.
  • Peter, another online course developer who has some course facilitation experience

Goals (focus on Joan, the target learner of this design): Joan wants to fulfill the requirements of her contract and design an online module that meets the needs of the project team as quickly as possible. She is also keen to learn about approaches that she can potentially apply to current and future classroom teaching.

Settings: Joan is generally available to learn in the evenings, after the kids have gone to bed. She has also agreed to attend a new two-day design & development workshop at her commissioning institution. There she will meet other course developers who have been engaged for similar eLearning projects and will experience and learn about the design process for online materials. 

Objects: Laptop, email, instructional design tutorials, design representation tools & outputs (storyboard?)

Actions:  Joan receives an email pointing her to the instructional design tutorials. She takes them, digests them, does the exercises, explores some of the tools mentioned (eg wikis), and takes notes. Two weeks later she attends the Design & Development workshop.

Events: At the workshop, Joan works with a fellow online course developer on a design-related activity specially devised for new eLearning designers. She explores learning design visualization tools and begins to sketch out an initial course design. 

Results: By the end of the workshop, Joan creates a draft storyboard that shows great promise for integrating a variety of instructional strategies and media in a pedagogically-driven way. She shares the storyboard with the project team, gets their feedback, and plans to use her design as a blueprint for development.

Your design: The activity/resource we are designing will help ensure that Joan gets off to a good start with her project. It will allow her to visualize and share her design ideas and has given her plenty of food for thought for her face-to-face teaching also. 

I’m claiming (or perhaps assuming?) that:

  • Joan will take the pre-workshop tutorials and will attend the Design & Development workshop
  • Joan is interested in learning about effective online learning design through a workshop experience
  • The prerequisite instructional design tutorials will provide an effective introduction to important ID theory and practice, and will raise her awareness of potential educational tools & technologies
  • The learning design visualization tools will be user friendly and helpful to Joan as someone who is new to designing learning

Clare Gormley
23:44 on 22 January 2013 (Edited 12:14 on 24 January 2013)

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Clare Gormley
11:53pm 22 January 2013


Thanks for the feedback Daniel! 

Sheila MacNeill
8:44am 23 January 2013


Brilliant Clare - well done for such a thorough job. S

Clare Gormley
1:16pm 23 January 2013


Thanks very much Sheila! I promise I'll reply to your suggested scenario later today/tonight. I definitely like the WebQuest idea you have suggested and I will reply "properly" later.  C

Morten Mosgaard
10:52am 24 January 2013


Great read, in fact I would call it motivating :)

I think this way of doing a scenario give's a good picture of how a participant-situation could be, and how a story of participating can fold out.

Here's my suggestion to give a hopefully constructive perspective you can use:

The only thing I can put a small finger on is under your claims: "Joan is interested in learning about effective online learning design" - In think the word "effective" has a change to be too much "what you think you do" and less "what people will be sure to experience". Perhaps a better frase would be "Joan is interested in learning about online learning design through this kind of Design and Development Workshop"?

Clare Gormley
12:16pm 24 January 2013


Thanks very much for the feedback, Morten. It does indeed help to be specific so I've revised that claim accordingly. Cheers, Clare

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