SAT: Innovative Storytelling: A study of Traditional and Digital Storytelling in the Primary Classroom (Helen Meyer)

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Dr Simon Ball
5 February 2014

The presentation will portray the values of innovative storytelling in primary school classrooms by looking at traditional and digital storytelling.
Stories are an intrinsic part of our society. The influence of storytelling can be seen in all aspects of life from movies, books, religions, to paintings and music to name but a few. Stories are everywhere. They define our dreams, values, fears and prejudices. Stories help us define who we are.
With the arrival of new technologies and their consequent integration within educational curriculums, teachers and students face an abundance of attractive opportunities and activities which can replace and complement more traditional teaching and learning methods. Digital storytelling is one such possibility. The presentation will explain what digital storytelling is and give a brief overview of digital storytelling as an example of an innovative practice supported by Kuboni et al.’s (2006) definition of innovation as “making changes to something established by introducing something new”.
Attention will be paid as to why storytelling (whether traditional or digital) is important in education. The aim of the course H818 is to “share knowledge and practice...through online dissemination and informed through engagement with others in peer reflection” (Open University, 2013). Each and everyone one of us share a wide variety of personal experiences, values and ways of understanding. We use language as a tool to shape our thoughts and feelings as well as exchanging information and ideas. We tell our own stories and reach out and connect with one another. The presentation will emphasise that stories can link not only between the world of classroom and home but also between the classroom and beyond.
Telling stories in a digital and creative manner calls for change in practice, understanding and skills for both teachers and students. The presentation will highlight these changes and use case studies, videos and research literature to look at how different storytelling techniques have already been put into use by students and teachers. Particular focus will be given to show how students and teachers benefit from creating and using digital stories.
The advantages and disadvantages of innovative storytelling will be explored and also its suitability within primary classroom settings. The 21st century skills that students gain through using digital storytelling will be identified and researchers’ arguments will be examined and weighed in the light of different perspectives.
Finally the presentation will examine the factors that teachers need to consider to successfully incorporate innovative storytelling in the classroom. The analysis will reveal the implications and make recommendations for those working with children in a primary setting. In presenting this paper I will share examples, the process of construction and reflections on the children’s use of digital storytelling.

Extra content

Embedded Content

To fulfil the requirement for part 4 of the EMA - Poster on Vimeo

To fulfil the requirement for part 4 of the EMA - Poster on Vimeo

added by Helen Meyer

To fulfil the requirement for part 4 of the EMA - Presentation on Vimeo (post conference)

To fulfil the requirement for part 4 of the EMA - Presentation on Vimeo (post conference)

added by Helen Meyer

To fulfil the requirement for part 4 of the EMA - Artefact in progress

To fulfil the requirement for part 4 of the EMA - Artefact in progress

added by Helen Meyer

Contribute

Marshal Anderson
12:08pm 13 February 2014


I wondered if there's any conflict between the kind of creative (inspirational?) approach we see here and the demands of institutions and governments?

Dr Simon Ball
7:38pm 15 February 2014


Following the live presentations, we asked each speaker to respond to questions posed by audience members. In the short time available, it was not possible to put all of the questions submitted to the speaker for a response. We asked all speakers if they would respond to the unanswered questions here on Cloudworks. Here are all of the questions asked during the session:

  • I wondered if there's any conflict between the kind of creative (inspirational?)
    approach we see here and the demands of institutions and governments?

  • Digital story-telling can still be fiction surely.

  • digital or analogue there is a crucial definer - is it a story that is either worth telling or told well?

  • apparently 'real life' stories are overtaking fictional stories in terms of reader popularity

  • My kids would love to produce digital stories instead of handwriting but they are made to hand write so that they can achieve SATs results

  • CPD in digital skills is crucial in schools particularly primary school teachers.
  • Secondary school is even worse. teaching tech savvy kids how to use basic packages
    My 7 year old taught me how to use smartboards when they were introduced into college a few years ago. Used as a matter of course in primary school!!

  • Do you think using digital story telling would open up opportunities for dyslexic children in particular?

Clem WIlkinson
7:42am 18 February 2014


Do you think using digital story telling would open up opportunities for dyslexic children in particular?

Definitely. I believe that when possible the learning objective should not be restricted by traditonal assesment methods. There are many ways to tell a story. The assessment of spelling, grammar and handwriting should not be condused with other elements. I've known students who can tell a great story, but have illegible handwriting.

I'd be very interested to read how this study is developed  further.

Helen Meyer
4:20pm 25 February 2014 (Edited 4:21pm 25 February 2014)


  • I wondered if there's any conflict between the kind of creative (inspirational?) 
    approach we see here and the demands of institutions and governments?

 

Possibly we could turn this question around and ask if our learning institutions and governments are keeping up with the education that students are getting outside of school?  

Are READING, WRITING, LISTENING and SPEAKING the key to Literacy in this day and age? Inexpensive, easy-to-use, widely distributed new media tools define literacy in new ways. I find Ohler’s (2007) definition of literacy “consuming and producing the media forms of the day, whatever they may be” far more suitable, after all we are transitioning from a text-based culture to a multimedia collage culture. Transitions bring about change, and there is rarely change without conflict. New media forms are evolving faster than our understanding of the literacy skills and standards needed to support them. Students are developing the skills they need to create new media largely without help from schools!! Teachers, under pressure to help students pass high stakes tests, are reluctant to require new media projects of students because they do not know how to evaluate schoolwork that is not primarily text-based…the list goes on and on!

Helen Meyer
4:33pm 25 February 2014


  • Digital story-telling can still be fiction surely.

 

Digital stories might be fiction or non-fiction.

Helen Meyer
5:00pm 25 February 2014


  • digital or analogue there is a crucial definer - is it a story that is either worth telling or told well?

 

Digital storytelling is a new variation on an old theme.  People have always told stories; part of the human experience involves passing down the details of our lives, from the incredible and extraordinary to the mundane. Stories have gone from oral recitations to book format and more recently to photographs and video. Digital stories are simply an extension of the basic human need to tell one’s own story. 

Gilbert Tiqui
4:43am 15 July 2017


Greetings!

I am currently processing  my study on Traditional and Digitized Storytelling in connection with the Literary Comprehension Performance of the learners. It would be great help for me and on my study regarding the full discussion of your article on "SAT: Innovative Storytelling: A study of Traditional and Digital Storytelling in the Primary Classroom". Looking forward on your response. 

 

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