SAT: Tackling Plagiarism Positively: An Online Resource Bank for Academic English Teachers (Anna Orridge)

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Anna Orridge
12 January 2016

Plagiarism costs universities time and money. Academic boards must be convened, interviews arranged and remedial workshops put in place alongside existing modules. Furthermore, the consequences for students themselves are often severe, ranging from reduced marks to possible exclusion from their institution. A recent report from Times suggests that the problem is particularly prevalent amongst L2 students (those who speak English as a second language).

 

Universities are fully aware of this problem, and many have produced online tutorials or 'learning objects' for students to pursue in their own time. These are sometimes very negative in tone, with long and intimidating lists of what students need to avoid. Others, however, are well-structured and informative. Manchester University's learning object, “Original Thinking Allowed: Avoiding Plagiarism”, for example, steers the user through a number of interactive activities, showing different forms of plagiarism and malpractice.

 

I would contend, however, that issues surrounding citation, referencing and intellectual property are taught more effectively when 'eased' into an existing curriculum, alongside relevant topics. An ideal time to prompt L2 students to think about citation and referencing would surely be during their pre-sessional or in-sessional English courses. In this way, linguistic difficulties can be tackled alongside potential misunderstandings about attribution.

 

This multi-media presentation for the H818 conference will introduce “Tackling Plagiarism Positively: an online resource for Academic English tutors”, a project aligned with the theme of Innovation. The resource bank, currently in development, is targeted at Academic English tutors who are preparing students at Upper-Intermediate to Advanced level for tertiary study at English-speaking institutions. This site consists of easily adaptable lesson plans which can be easily adapted to fit into an existing curriculum and covers vital areas of grammar, vocabulary and language skills alongside plagiarism-specific topics.

 

The presentation will commence with a discussion outlining some of the major causes of plagiarism amongst L2 students. I will talk about the role of linguistic difficulties and feelings of being overwhelmed in the first years of study. Participants will then be guided through an extract from an online “Choose your Own Adventure Story” activity, featuring text, audio and animation, designed to introduce students to some of the key concepts surrounding plagiarism. They will also be introduced to a lesson from the site in development, on the subject of paraphrase and quotation.

 

Participants will come away with a clear understanding of the issues surrounding plagiarism by second language students, and the ways in which this new online resource will help EAP teachers tackle them.

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First lesson plan on my blog

First lesson plan on my blog

added by Anna Orridge

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John Baglow
5:52pm 17 January 2016


Anna, this is very appealing visually, and your commentary is also very clear. I assume this is your poster rather than your presentation. I have just spent quite a bit of time, having read Simon's instructions for the conference about formats. I had a powerpoint but it saves as pptx which is not a permitted format. Also, it doesn't sound as if the ppt can include video clips so I have taken mine out. I just wonder how your impressive powtoon will upload to OU LIVE. I actually went into OU LIVE to see if my pptx would upload and indeed it didn't. When I have a moment I'll try it with the simplified ppt version.

John Kerr
12:27pm 18 January 2016


HI Anna,

I'm looking forward to this talk (if i can watch live). Some points from me:

You mention 'easeing into the cirriculum' is there time for that? An issue i've always faced is that plagarism classes  (academic writing dev classes) are often optional and lots of students don't feel the need to attend. Would there be time taken away from teaching to deliver this? 

Could you design a course that allows students to test their skills and upload to a site, such as Turnitin, so they can visualise what the systems pick up. This may heklp reinforce your resource bank and place the power back into the learners' hands.

John 

Dr Carol Waites
3:07pm 18 January 2016


Hi Anna

Today I found a link to a Webinar on plagiarism offered by Cambridge

http://view.emarketing.cambridge.org/?j=fe9511707365037b74&m=fea415707566037c75&ls=fdf515737c640c7a7014707c&l=ff3116757066&s=fe2b16777261047a701473&jb=ffcf14&ju=fe3415707260067c7c1572&r=0

This is the description:

Plagiarism: Why students do it and how you can help.
How often do you have to deal with plagiarism in your classes? Plagiarism is a major issue for teachers everywhere, and there are few resources available to help students develop the skills needed to avoid it. In this session, Jeanne Lambert will discuss research on plagiarism and offer skill-based solutions.

Thursday, February 11, 2016
20:30 PM GMT - 21:30 PM GMT

Anna Orridge
3:53pm 18 January 2016


Hi John B Thanks for the heads-up, and yes, this is the poster. I think the presentations have to clock in at around 15 mins. It's useful to know that we can't use video clips. I think I'll probably use PowerPoint for the presentation, so this shouldn't be an issue. Hi John K, I really like the idea of showing sts how TurnItIn works. Unfortunately, I don't currently have access to the software, so this is not an option for me right now. You're right about academic writing classes having attendance issues. I'm envisaging these lessons forming part of a pre-sessional program, so the students would be studying English anyway, and this would slot neatly into the existing curriculum. It would, indeed, be far harder to integrate with other studies on an actual degree courses. Thank you for your feedback. Hi Carol, Thank you for letting me know. I will definitely sign up. A

Dave Martin
7:34pm 18 January 2016


Just to say you can use video clips. Check with Simon on this one.

Anna Orridge
10:52am 19 January 2016


Yes, I did, thank you. I found a useful exchange between John and Simon in the Conference Forum. Will attend teh OU Live Session this evening too.

John Kerr
10:51am 20 January 2016


Hi Anna,

Slotting into the curriculum can be tricky given the amount of time this may take. Do you have an indication of how long you see this taking to complete? Is it an academic delivered approach, scaffolded onto current material or more focused on a community of practice allowing learners to interact as the work through the material?

Hoping to make the live session but work is just chaotic at the minute.

John

Anna Orridge
3:38pm 26 January 2016


Hi John, 

I intend to finish the resource bank in July, and trial it with the university I last worked at. After feedback, I'll put it online as an OER in September. I hope this is realistic.

I would antcipate that the resources would be scaffolded onto current material. It would be difficult for me to develop a community of practice at this level, although I would hope that teachers would ensure a good level of student interaction as they worked through the lesson plans.

It would be great to have you at the presentation, but don't worry if you can't. I'll make all the slides available, and hopefully the transcript too.

 

 

Anna

Lisa Hale
12:26pm 30 January 2016


Hi Anna

I'm looking forward to seeing your presentation and would like to follow you for my EMA - if that's okay. This is a topic which is very important to me and I'm always looking for new ways to deal with it and I'm looking forward to seeing your resources. The idea of tackling this issue in a positive way is key and I agree that many of the materials focus on 'don't do this or you will be in trouble'  and are aimed at native speakers of English. Unfortunately, the Times article also presented this issue in a very negative light. There is a huge difference between someone going out and buying a custom written essay and a student whose first language is not English producing instances of what's know as 'patchwriting' as their  English language is lower.  For me integrating it into a course/curriculum would be more useful as this is not the type of area where you could do a one-off workshop or ask the students to look at a one-off online tutorial and hope that they've got it - the skills that you mention need to be scaffolded, developed and practised and the students given feedback and the confidence to be able to avoid possible instances of plagiarism. 

I'm not sure I will be able to see your presentation live as I have a training day that day and it finishes at 3pm when you are on!! If I can't make it, I'll watch the recording.

Lisa

Chris Gray
4:43pm 30 January 2016


Anna

Raising awareness amongst students of plagiarism is an important aspect of their learning process. What we have found in many vocational learners is the frequent use of copy and pasting of information from the Internet, with no referencing etc., often misspellings (US English v British English) and not actually answering the question in a concise way. They haven't demonstrated learning but rather the ability to locate and extract data.

Your project can highlight to students not only the need to avoid plagiarism but also why learners need to reflect on what they have found in their searches and how that may be interpreted in their own words and then effectively applied to the question being asked.

Will your project look at how plagiarism is effectively explained to students by tutors, or is this a potential future extension of the project?

Anna Orridge
10:38pm 1 February 2016


Hi Lisa, Yes, you are more than welcome to follow me. I'll put my extended abstract form TMA 2 up on Studio tomorrow, which will hopefully help you a bit with the review. I have a go at the Times article too, which, as you say, was borderline misleading in some parts. And yes, the issue definitely needs to be handled in a multi-layered 'sandwich' type way, which is why it so often gets neglected. I'm intending to do a dry run in OU Live before the real thing. Would that be of any interest? Hi Chris, That's a really perceptive question. Thank you. I'm going to save it up for the conference, if that's ok. Hope to see you there.

Dr Simon Ball
10:43am 14 February 2016


Hi Anna

Here is a summary of the questions/comments from your presentation - please respond as you wish:

  • Different issues in some disciplines - science often has data plagiarism - people 'borrowing' lab results from each other.
  • good point part of good academic practice
    have you related your approach to all the research on 'narratives'
  • I could see Twine being really useful in this scenario too for creating interactive scenario based text games https://twinery.org/
  • downloaded lessons across all the usual suspects of devices?
  • Example to illustrate the grey shades of plagiarism - many students are confused about what counts - http://www.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/tandl/showcase/presentations2012july/plagiarism exercise.pdf
  • WHere are you housing these? On what platform?
  • Do you find that students often don't engage with a quotation? They see it as a clinching argument rather than something to be engaged with?
  • Really pleased re telling students WHY paraphrasing is useful skill. I tell students about the reasons for referencing as an important starting point.
  • Your goal here Anna reminds me of Lisa Kidger's presentation last year where her goal was to teach students accurate legal referencing which they struggled with. Lisa created a great solution using Moodle Lessons http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloud/view/8871
  • Why choose your own for students, but ?? not for tutors?
  • where does study skills 'fit' in any discipline in HE? especially digital literacy skills and good academic practice
  • Some other peer bookmarked links of plagiarism here - https://delicious.com/search/plagiarism

Anna Orridge
5:40pm 16 February 2016


Thanks, Simon. Wow. That's a lot of comments. I'll try to do them bit by bit, because i don't think I can handle them all in one comment.

First: Quotation.

Yes, I absolutely agree that students see quotation as a clinching argument, not something to be engaged with or challenged. I once gave a group of study skills students a website entitled "Global Warming Hoax" and asked them to read through it and give me their first impressions. In a class of fifteen students, not even one challenged the claims made about climate change being a fraud. Most of them summarised what the site said. Among many students, I encountered the attitude that if an authority of some kind, (a teacher, the writer of an article) has said or written it, it may be presented as incontrovertible truth. This relates to critical thinking skills, of course, and is far too wide an area for me to tackle with this resource, but it will be sometihng I intend to touch on.

Dr Carol Waites
12:41pm 21 February 2016


Hi Anna

I was curious to see your blog but have been unable to access it. Why might that be?  Can you give me a direct link perhaps?  PS I chose yours to review for our weekly assignments.  It is on OpenStudio or here.

http://learn1.open.ac.uk/mod/oublog/viewpost.php?post=174008

Best regards

Carol

Anna Orridge
3:50pm 21 February 2016


Hi Carol,

I have no idea why you cannot access it. Perhaps I got the link wrong  - I'll have another look. In the meantime, if you go into my OpenStudio My Project space, you'll find exactly the same thing in "Paraphrasing and Quotation Lesson Plan". Thank you for reviewing my project. I'll head on over and take a look!

 

Best Wishes,

Anna

Anna Orridge
4:00pm 21 February 2016


  • Different issues in some disciplines - science often has data plagiarism - people 'borrowing' lab results from each other. Yes, I can only really speak for English and Business Studies, as these are the disciplines I have taught and experienced. The science one is tricky - I don't know how academics would even be able to pick that up. 
  • good point part of good academic practice
    have you related your approach to all the research on 'narratives' I must admit, I haven't heard of that at all. I would be very interested to be pointed to some articles.
  • I could see Twine being really useful in this scenario too for creating interactive scenario based text games https://twinery.org/ Thank you. I shall check this out.
  • downloaded lessons across all the usual suspects of devices? I haven't got that far yet! The lesson plans, I think, would be PDFs, so I believe these woudl be accessible on most devices. The Choose Your Own Adventure might be more of a problem, as it's on Google Slides at the moment.
  • Example to illustrate the grey shades of plagiarism - many students are confused about what counts - http://www.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/tandl/showcase/presentations2012july/plagiarism exercise.pdf
    Yes, that's a very nice example. I did consdier covering the whole issue of inadvertent plagiarism, but did not really have enough time to cover it in the presentation. Quite a lot of these issues arise from students being unaware of how to distingusih common knowledge from an original stance, and this is an area I intend to cover in the lessons.
  • WHere are you housing these? On what platform? WordPress at the moment. I may switch to MoodleCloud once I'm at a later stage of development.
  • Really pleased re telling students WHY paraphrasing is useful skill. I tell students about the reasons for referencing as an important starting point. Yes, this is a good way to get them started. I'd recommend the following article for an in-depth treatment of this particular issue (you can find it in the OU library: Why am I paraphrasing?”: Undergraduate ESL writers’engagement with source-based academic writing and reading (Alan Hirvela, Qian Du)
  • Your goal here Anna reminds me of Lisa Kidger's presentation last year where her goal was to teach students accurate legal referencing which they struggled with. Lisa created a great solution using Moodle Lessons http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloud/view/8871 Thank you, I had noticed it but you reminded me to go back and have a look. Legal referencing, as I gather, has quite distinct demands, but it's interesting to see how Lisa tackled it.
  • Why choose your own for students, but ?? not for tutors? Sorry, I'm not quite sure what this refers to...will go back to the recording.
  • where does study skills 'fit' in any discipline in HE? especially digital literacy skills and good academic practice At the moment, it tends to get covered in foundation courses, and then it's kind of assumed that students will make progress when they start their degrees. There is usually a handsome collection in most libraries dedicated to study skills whcih never gets flicked through. I think the problem is that students don't see why they should bother with something 'extra', which is not graded.
  • Some other peer bookmarked links of plagiarism here - https://delicious.com/search/plagiarism Thank you!

Dr Simon Ball
9:06am 23 February 2016


Many Congratulations Anna! Your presentation has been voted by delegates to be one of the most effective of the H818 Online Conference 2016 and you are officially one of our H818 Presentation Star Open Badge Winners! Please see how to Apply for your Badge here: http://cloudworks.ac.uk/badge/view/33

Well done!

Simon

H818 Conference Organiser

Anna Orridge
9:25am 23 February 2016


Hi Simon,

Thank you, both to you and to the delegates, I am most chuffed (and a little surprised, as I got the timing wrong...)

Anna

Dr Susan Morris
2:00pm 24 February 2016


Quality of explanation of the subject matter

All teachers experience plagiarism. How to deal with it - face-to-face and online outwith software solutions can be a nebulous endeavour.  

I connected witht the quality of your contextual insights that you brought to the subject matter, making it fresh to listen.  You clearly identified the main barriers affecting student learning for which plagiarism is a solution.

Utility of materials designed 

Your presentation showed how long and how deeply you have engaged with the area. I am pleased to read in the above comments that you are going to open up the resource as an OER and in this year.  This will include the variety of learners that can be touched by the resource.

Quality of technological interactivity

Scenarios created an individualised learning experience for the teachers/students. There were elements that I recognised and connected with while you were presented. I look forward to the overall resource. 

Opportunities for deeper learning

Your presentation made clear the complexity of the problem of plagiarism and offered a positive way of improving outcomes for students and teachers. 

Assurance of accessibility

Your presentation was fully accessible.  

Well done on the Presentation Star Open Badge, it is one of the highlights of the conference.

Keep in touch, Susan 

Anna Orridge
1:27pm 25 February 2016


Hi Susan,

 

Thank you! Your review is kind and very helpful. I will indeed keep in touch and I hope that you will like the eventual results.

Anna

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