FRI: GCSE Comp Sci Teachers' OER: Good practice (Jonathan/Jonty Leese).

Abstract:

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Jonathan Leese
6 January 2019

OER (Open Education Resources) are teaching and learning resources such as textbooks distributed under a Creative Commons license that often facilitate the free use and repurposing of these resources by others (Hilton, 2016).  In state secondary education in the UK (age 11-18) school budgets have been reduced in real times in the recent past whilst OER resources are not well adopted despite offering a financially efficient solution (Rolfe and Fowler, 2012).  For example, text books cost the average student $132 in Poland per academic year (Hagemann and Hugyecz, 2016) up to $900 pa in universities in America  (Hilton et al., 2014).  It could be seen that in the UK, secondary education are not at the forefront of using technology to its full potential, with few schools using open source products effectively.  In the UK it has not been helped that there has been complete intransigence from the government in response to the requirement to “make a strategic response to the 2017 Ljubljana OER Action Plan set out by UNESCO to make publicly funded educational resources available to improve the learning experience for all” (WonkHE, 2018).

Many schools used ICT to support learning (through SIMS for registers, teachers2parents for texting parents and parentpay for making electronic payments without the need to bring cash to school).  Therefore what applies to schools as innovation around OER may not be truly cutting edge but relative to the setting they find themselves in, embracing the spirit of OER may well be seen as such.  The key principles of OER materials are in sharing, remixing and repurposing  (Wiley, 2014) which allow the use and reuse of resources, often with no copyright restrictions.

To address this, and as part of the Open University H818 online conference around innovation, a website has been created highlighting key resources to signpost teachers.  This will include a presentation where key principles, educational underpinning and some cutting edge examples of OER from around the world will be shared, highlighted and discussed.   The focus is aimed at GCSE (years 10 and 11 in the UK) Computer Science teachers who teach the specifications of these UK exam boards.

There have been small projects before, but not focussing exclusively on Computer Science where 69,000 people sat the GCSE exam in Summer 2017 (Ofqual, 2017).  The research that has been completed focusses at university level where the culture of OER (such as the adoption of Moodle – an OER platform) is established.  Can an online resource engage teachers and learners at GCSE level in using OER resources?

This presentation will include defining key terms of OER, sharing best practice of both e-textbooks MOOCs looking at examples that are specific to Computer Science whilst reviewing exemplar materials from other subjects.  In the sense of innovating, we will also consider common barriers to the successful usage adoption of OER and finally we will discuss barriers to adoption of OER resources. The presentation will conclude with opportunities to engage with the author around any questions you may have.

 

References:

Hagemann, M. and Hugyecz, P. (2016) Poland Is Pioneering the World’s First National Open Textbook Program, Open Society Foundations. Available at: https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/voices/poland-pioneering-worlds-first-national-open-textbook-program (Accessed: 9 November 2018).

Hilton, J. (2016) ‘Open educational resources and college textbook choices: a review of research on efficacy and perceptions’, Educational Technology Research and Development. Springer US, 64(4), pp. 573–590. doi: 10.1007/s11423-016-9434-9.

Hilton, J. L., Robinson, T. J., Wiley, D. and Ackerman, J. D. (2014) ‘Cost-savings achieved in two semesters through the adoption of open educational resources | Hilton III | The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning’, The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 15(2). Available at: http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/1700/2833[10/28/2015.

Ofqual (2017) Summer exam entries for GCSEs, Level 1/2 certificates, AS and A levels: provisional figures April 2017. Available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/619380/Background_information_-_summer_2017_exam_entries_GCSEs_Level_1_2_AS_and_A_levels.pdf (Accessed: 2 January 2019).

Rolfe, V. and Fowler, M. (2012) HEA/JISC Open Educational Resources case study: pedagogical development from OER practice How institutional culture can change to adopt open practices Outline Background. Available at: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/system/files/oer_cs_vivien_rolfe_how_institutional_culture_can_change.pdf (Accessed: 2 November 2018).

Wiley, D. (2014) The Access Compromise and the 5th R. Available at: https://opencontent.org/blog/archives/3221.

WonkHE (2018) Openness in education: a call to action for policy makers | Wonkhe | Comment. Available at: https://wonkhe.com/blogs/openness-education-call-action-policy-makers/ (Accessed: 3 January 2019).

 

 

Please see my Presentation in the link below

Extra content

OER (Open Education Resources) are teaching and learning resources such as textbooks distributed under a Creative Commons license that often facilitate the free use and repurposing of these resources by others (Hilton, 2016).  In state secondary education in the UK (age 11-18) school budgets have been reduced in real times in the recent past whilst OER resources are not well adopted despite offering a financially efficient solution (Rolfe and Fowler, 2012).  For example, text books cost the average student $132 in Poland per academic year (Hagemann and Hugyecz, 2016) up to $900 pa in universities in America  (Hilton et al., 2014).  It could be seen that in the UK, secondary education are not at the forefront of using technology to its full potential, with few schools using open source products effectively.  In the UK it has not been helped that there has been complete intransigence from the government in response to the requirement to “make a strategic response to the 2017 Ljubljana OER Action Plan set out by UNESCO to make publicly funded educational resources available to improve the learning experience for all” (WonkHE, 2018).

Many schools used ICT to support learning (through SIMS for registers, teachers2parents for texting parents and parentpay for making electronic payments without the need to bring cash to school).  Therefore what applies to schools as innovation around OER may not be truly cutting edge but relative to the setting they find themselves in, embracing the spirit of OER may well be seen as such.  The key principles of OER materials are in sharing, remixing and repurposing  (Wiley, 2014) which allow the use and reuse of resources, often with no copyright restrictions.

To address this, and as part of the Open University H818 online conference around innovation, a website has been created highlighting key resources to signpost teachers.  This will include a presentation where key principles, educational underpinning and some cutting edge examples of OER from around the world will be shared, highlighted and discussed.   The focus is aimed at GCSE (years 10 and 11 in the UK) Computer Science teachers who teach the specifications of these UK exam boards.

There have been small projects before, but not focussing exclusively on Computer Science where 69,000 people sat the GCSE exam in Summer 2017 (Ofqual, 2017).  The research that has been completed focusses at university level where the culture of OER (such as the adoption of Moodle – an OER platform) is established.  Can an online resource engage teachers and learners at GCSE level in using OER resources?

This presentation will include defining key terms of OER, sharing best practice of both e-textbooks MOOCs looking at examples that are specific to Computer Science whilst reviewing exemplar materials from other subjects.  In the sense of innovating, we will also consider common barriers to the successful usage adoption of OER and finally we will discuss barriers to adoption of OER resources. The presentation will conclude with opportunities to engage with the author around any questions you may have.

 

References:

Hagemann, M. and Hugyecz, P. (2016) Poland Is Pioneering the World’s First National Open Textbook Program, Open Society Foundations. Available at: https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/voices/poland-pioneering-worlds-first-national-open-textbook-program (Accessed: 9 November 2018).

Hilton, J. (2016) ‘Open educational resources and college textbook choices: a review of research on efficacy and perceptions’, Educational Technology Research and Development. Springer US, 64(4), pp. 573–590. doi: 10.1007/s11423-016-9434-9.

Hilton, J. L., Robinson, T. J., Wiley, D. and Ackerman, J. D. (2014) ‘Cost-savings achieved in two semesters through the adoption of open educational resources | Hilton III | The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning’, The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 15(2). Available at: http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/1700/2833[10/28/2015.

Ofqual (2017) Summer exam entries for GCSEs, Level 1/2 certificates, AS and A levels: provisional figures April 2017. Available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/619380/Background_information_-_summer_2017_exam_entries_GCSEs_Level_1_2_AS_and_A_levels.pdf (Accessed: 2 January 2019).

Rolfe, V. and Fowler, M. (2012) HEA/JISC Open Educational Resources case study: pedagogical development from OER practice How institutional culture can change to adopt open practices Outline Background. Available at: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/system/files/oer_cs_vivien_rolfe_how_institutional_culture_can_change.pdf (Accessed: 2 November 2018).

Wiley, D. (2014) The Access Compromise and the 5th R. Available at: https://opencontent.org/blog/archives/3221.

WonkHE (2018) Openness in education: a call to action for policy makers | Wonkhe | Comment. Available at: https://wonkhe.com/blogs/openness-education-call-action-policy-makers/ (Accessed: 3 January 2019).

Jonathan Leese
14:10 on 10 January 2019

OER (Open Education Resources) are teaching and learning resources such as textbooks distributed under a Creative Commons license that often facilitate the free use and repurposing of these resources by others (Hilton, 2016).  In state secondary education in the UK (age 11-18) school budgets have been reduced in real times in the recent past whilst OER resources are not well adopted despite offering a financially efficient solution (Rolfe and Fowler, 2012).  For example, text books cost the average student $132 in Poland per academic year (Hagemann and Hugyecz, 2016) up to $900 pa in universities in America  (Hilton et al., 2014).  It could be seen that in the UK, secondary education are not at the forefront of using technology to its full potential, with few schools using open source products effectively.  In the UK it has not been helped that there has been complete intransigence from the government in response to the requirement to “make a strategic response to the 2017 Ljubljana OER Action Plan set out by UNESCO to make publicly funded educational resources available to improve the learning experience for all” (WonkHE, 2018).

Many schools used ICT to support learning (through SIMS for registers, teachers2parents for texting parents and parentpay for making electronic payments without the need to bring cash to school).  Therefore what applies to schools as innovation around OER may not be truly cutting edge but relative to the setting they find themselves in, embracing the spirit of OER may well be seen as such.  The key principles of OER materials are in sharing, remixing and repurposing  (Wiley, 2014) which allow the use and reuse of resources, often with no copyright restrictions.

To address this, and as part of the Open University H818 online conference around innovation, a website has been created highlighting key resources to signpost teachers.  This will include a presentation where key principles, educational underpinning and some cutting edge examples of OER from around the world will be shared, highlighted and discussed.   The focus is aimed at GCSE (years 10 and 11 in the UK) Computer Science teachers who teach the specifications of these UK exam boards.

There have been small projects before, but not focussing exclusively on Computer Science where 69,000 people sat the GCSE exam in Summer 2017 (Ofqual, 2017).  The research that has been completed focusses at university level where the culture of OER (such as the adoption of Moodle – an OER platform) is established.  Can an online resource engage teachers and learners at GCSE level in using OER resources?

This presentation will include defining key terms of OER, sharing best practice of both e-textbooks MOOCs looking at examples that are specific to Computer Science whilst reviewing exemplar materials from other subjects.  In the sense of innovating, we will also consider common barriers to the successful usage adoption of OER and finally we will discuss barriers to adoption of OER resources. The presentation will conclude with opportunities to engage with the author around any questions you may have.

 

References:

Hagemann, M. and Hugyecz, P. (2016) Poland Is Pioneering the World’s First National Open Textbook Program, Open Society Foundations. Available at: https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/voices/poland-pioneering-worlds-first-national-open-textbook-program (Accessed: 9 November 2018).

Hilton, J. (2016) ‘Open educational resources and college textbook choices: a review of research on efficacy and perceptions’, Educational Technology Research and Development. Springer US, 64(4), pp. 573–590. doi: 10.1007/s11423-016-9434-9.

Hilton, J. L., Robinson, T. J., Wiley, D. and Ackerman, J. D. (2014) ‘Cost-savings achieved in two semesters through the adoption of open educational resources | Hilton III | The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning’, The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 15(2). Available at: http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/1700/2833[10/28/2015.

Ofqual (2017) Summer exam entries for GCSEs, Level 1/2 certificates, AS and A levels: provisional figures April 2017. Available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/619380/Background_information_-_summer_2017_exam_entries_GCSEs_Level_1_2_AS_and_A_levels.pdf (Accessed: 2 January 2019).

Rolfe, V. and Fowler, M. (2012) HEA/JISC Open Educational Resources case study: pedagogical development from OER practice How institutional culture can change to adopt open practices Outline Background. Available at: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/system/files/oer_cs_vivien_rolfe_how_institutional_culture_can_change.pdf (Accessed: 2 November 2018).

Wiley, D. (2014) The Access Compromise and the 5th R. Available at: https://opencontent.org/blog/archives/3221.

WonkHE (2018) Openness in education: a call to action for policy makers | Wonkhe | Comment. Available at: https://wonkhe.com/blogs/openness-education-call-action-policy-makers/ (Accessed: 3 January 2019).

Jonathan Leese
14:11 on 10 January 2019

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