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Where are institutions in terms of technology adoption?

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Gráinne Conole
8 October 2009

Prompted by a tweet from @laurapasquini and a link to a blog post Dave's Educational blog (lnk above) has made me wonder how technologically ready institutions really are given that the internet has been around for about a decade now. Our institution recently did an e-learning preparedness survey and it would be intriguing to see what the results are in comparision to Dave's survey. I wonder how truthfully individuals completed the survey  and to what extent they said what they thought senior management wanted to hear...

  • What is the spectrum of technology preparedness?
  • Can we correlate particular interventions (technology initiatives, staff development programmes, innovation funds, etc) to update and embedding of technologies?
  • How accurate are institutional surveys of this kind and to what extent do people respond as they think they should, over emphasising uptake?

Extra content

Have added a link to the HE Academy benchmarking programme which was concerned with enabling institutions to establish where they were in terms of use of e-learning.

Gráinne Conole
12:07 on 8 October 2009

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dave cormier
1:31pm 8 October 2009


Hi there,

1. I can't imagine how you'd answer that question. If you come up with something i will be sure to steal it :)

2. The comment by diego leal on my blog was the one that got me thinking about this. I wonder about the impact of strategic plans... if the creation of the strategic plan is actually what contributes to the impact rather than the plan itself. The importance given to the issue inside the institution that lead to the request for a strategic plan might be more of a contributing factor to uptake then any plan making and following.

Your third question was the reason for the secrecy coupled with email addresses in the survey. I know the identity of each of the respondents and can attest to the honesty with which they responded. I'd prefer to do a qualitative informal survey of this kind to a broad based formal survey as it tends to combat some of those problems. It's more difficult to incorporate into a formal research paper but tends to circle around reality a bit more.

 cheers.

Gráinne Conole
2:10pm 8 October 2009


Hi Dave

actually re: honesty i was referring to people responding to our survey! ;-) ie a broader issues about validity of things like this when there is a power differential between who sends out the survey and those answer it!

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