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Doing scientific experiments: experiment design

Peter van Calsteren Tuesday 23 March, 2.45pm-3.45pm Workshop 3C 2nd floor library

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13 March 2010

Peter van Calsteren

Tuesday 23 March,
2.45pm-3.45pm
Workshop 3C
2nd floor. library, research meeting room

The ‘official’ guidance to Designing Experiments is in STM895, and various aspects are also discussed in other sessions; this talk is based on my personal experience and practice in doing experiments. I will talk about:

  • Excellence and Impact
  • Research methods and approach
  • Practical aspects of sample collection and laboratory work: methods and protocols
  • Data reduction and evaluation, significance, wider implications
  • General principles of: personal conduct, reduction of variables, reproducibility,  and Risk Assessment
  • Sir David King: code of conduct

Peter van Calsteren did his PhD in Leiden, The Netherlands in 1977 and came to the OU in 1980 on a 3 year research fellowship for the Petrogenesis Research Group. He has been a Senior Research Fellow since 2001 in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences.

His main research interests are in Isotope Geochemistry and include a wide range of topics related by the use of short half-life uranium daughter isotopes. This includes applications to the evolution of volcanic rocks, dating paleo-climate archives and paleo-anthropology. It also includes the related analytical methods, mostly mass spectrometry and laboratory methods and their design and safe application. He is running a NERC-funded facility at the OU to do collaborative research projects with other UK HEI colleagues and usually he has a large input into the design of these projects. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and a member of the NERC Peer Review College.

He would like to see himself as a field and experimental scientist, although he doesn’t see much of the inside of a chemistry lab these days.

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Tags

doctoral training   ethics   PhD skills   research   research skills   science   scientists   universal ethical code

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