The web-site is now in readonly mode. Login and registration are disabled. (28 June 2019)

R7C3 Feedback: Is there a routine flow of constructive, specific, diagnostic feed-back from teacher to learners?

Providing appropriate feedback to learners has one of the largest measurable effects of any...

Cloud created by:

Andrew Pollard
5 May 2010

Providing appropriate feedback to learners has one of the largest measurable effects of any teaching strategy (Hattie, 2009). This fact underlies ‘assessment for learning’ which has now been taken up in many school systems across the world. Such formative assessment is an integral part of pedagogy and is designed to help learners grow their capacity to manage their own learning. The TLRP project on Learning How to Learn (James et al, 2007) showed that the most effective teachers have frameworks of subject and developmental understanding which enable them to respond constructively to pupils’ attempts to learn. Such diagnostic and knowledgeable flexibility is essential, so assessment for learning benefits from supportive school and policy contexts. Peer and self-assessment feedback extends this principle further, enabling learners to begin to evaluate learning independently, for themselves.

TLRP’s Commentary, Assessment in Schools: Fit for purpose (Mansell et al, 2009), is a constructive critique of assessment policy in the UK.

Extra content

Embedded Content