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iCreaNet - Creativity Support in Japan

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Asger Harlung
24 March 2011

In order to include the perspectives from our Japanese colleagues, let us continue our discussions from the March 2011 workshop with asking and commenting on their online presentations here.

The idea is to include our Japanese colleagues by giving them feedback, while at the same time reflecting upon the impact their perspectives have on the experiences and views shared at the workshop.

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Barry Sponder
2:52pm 4 April 2011


優秀

Asger Harlung
3:01pm 7 April 2011


Dear Jun and Colleagues

Most of the workshop participants read your presentation through together. It did generate many good discussion sparks, and I am sure there will also be questions for you.

Sharing your presentation using the public link service in Dropbox: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/10086929/iCreaNet Sharefiles/iCreaNet_Oshima.pdf

I have two questions:

1) "Proportion of kids who dislike to creatively work with others is increasing!!!" - Why do you think that is?

2) (Not assuming that being Japanese you will necessarily have a special knowledge of Zen, but I've been obsessing a bit about it, so here goes - and then maybe you can give us some thoughts):

To my knowledge Zen Buddhism combines discipline of self with the aim of thinking very much out of the box. Question: Does Zen teaching and learning provide special means and angles to actually teach creativity - or methods and contexts for nurturing it?

Kind regards,

Asger

Jun Oshima
8:14pm 10 April 2011


Asnger:

I am happy to hear that my idea stimulated others in some sense.  Well, let me try to answer your questions:

1) "Proportion of kids who dislike to creatively work with others is increasing!!!" - Why do you think that is?

Well, there are a coupe of possible reasons.  Basically, most of kids do not have experiences that collaboration would help them step further.  So, they are quite adjusted to do things by themselves in the solo-context.  Now, the size of family in Japan is less then four which means that many families have only one child.  There might be no opportunities for children to naturally help each other at their home.  Schooling culture also influences their value of collaborative nature of intelligence.  Many researchers outside of Japan see Japanese children more collaborative than their children.  But, Japanese children are just adjusted to group work instructed by teachers in the classroom, maybe.  So, they are not likely to use their collaborative nature when they start new learning or activities without teachers' intervention.

2) (Not assuming that being Japanese you will necessarily have a special knowledge of Zen, but I've been obsessing a bit about it, so here goes - and then maybe you can give us some thoughts):

Honestly speaking, most Japanese are not aware of themselves as influenced by the philosophical background like Zen.  But, when I was a child, my teacher told us to think of what we did on the day with closing eyes and being quiet in the classroom.  I am not sure if kids these days are trained like this.  But I believe that we still have been influenced by our socio-historical background.

In my presentation slides, I gave Japanese naive understanding of creativity, i.e., creative individuals.  Japanese people may have a sense of creative persons that the creative individuals can use their special mode of thinking like Zen...

 

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