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OCWC Global 2011: OER Musings and Mapping the OER Landscape

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Patrick McAndrew
10 May 2011

 

A combined session with Cathy Casserly and Mike Smith offering their view of the current state of OER and Patrick McAndrew an overview of the work on building an evidence hub that helps share evidence and provide a map of activity in OER.
Cathy Casserly: 
Steps on the timeline:
1998: Open content, 99 Connexions, 2000 MIT OCW, 2001 Wikipedia, 2002 Hewlett, Creative Commons, Open Learning Initiative, UNESCO (first use of the term OER), 2005 TESSA, 2006 Khan Academy, 2007 Cape Town OE Declaration, 2008 OCWC, Flat World, 2009 Open High School Utah, 2011 Department of Labor call 4x$500m everything must be CC-BY.
As well as this history there is evidence that OER is becoming more accepted, while there remains things to be done: Platforms for resources need integrating – including iTunesU which needs to properly support Creative Commons licensing. There are many positive actions in progress: Google and Bing adding the CC licence to search; OECD working on policy for adoption of OER; New funders coming in. 
As the new CEO of Creative Commons, Cathy taking time to assess their next steps, but Creative commons is clearly now thinking about this space – and the way that CC can power OER.
A cycle where OER -> Data -> Theory then back to OER has always been part of the vision, growing participation offers the driver for this cycle.
Mike Smith: 
Use is the focus. Working on a  report with Brooking. Need insights into how IT can be used in developing world. OER is an important catalyst and component. Lesson don’t start with technology; start with imagination. Develop guidelines for use and enable sharing and take up.
OER use will track IT use in the developing world. The exception is openness – but data is missing of effectiveness. But as open helps spread and use it is clear that OER can be just as effective as non-OER AND can be more easily adapted.
Mike identified 6 drivers for OER to be used:
1: Access infrastructure
Broadband, platforms, speed of uptake, ease of finding quality.
2: Markey conditions
Prices down, supply up, hardware, tools – cloud, open source, kids as experts, NGOs that can support
3: Choice for use of technology – how useful?
Simple, easy, reliable, OER adds free and ease of adaptation
4: Cultural fit
No disrespect of threat
5: Add value?
Creates new access – OER opens locked boxes.
Thoughts on effectiveness – need big effects. Meta-analysis is ok for IT use supported by OER. Teacher v computer (no significant difference is a positive effect). Not the same for teacher v teacher + technology (no difference is negative!). 
6: Networks – the future?
Education + OER (TESSA/P2PU). Collective action. 
First rule – don’t start with technology, start with the problem.
Eg: classrooms in Nairobi slums. New projector +USB + crank powered. USB can have OER. NGO support and get take up.
Eg: postsecondary wants to upgrade knowledge infrastructure to western level – intranet to internet. Focus on the open. Across all aspects.
Mike’s summary offered elements of possible guidelines:
Start with problem, offer the right technical infrastructure, build in the social elements, ensure you add value.
The time is right for OCWC to offer OER to the world– create an OER Store – select what you need. 
Patrick McAndrew: (slides from this talk embedded below)
Showed a quick run through examples of mapping discussed with Cathy Casserly during her time as an OLnet Fellow before showing how at the OER meeting in San Franciscon initial claims and evidence/counter-evidence had been gathered in a “claims-garden”. At http://ci.olnet.org an evidence hub is being constructed with seeding from this exercise and from analysis of project reports. The next stage is to add more evidence and links to their sources and move towards an open process for adding and refining the evidence

A combined session with Cathy Casserly and Mike Smith offering their view of the current state of OER and Patrick McAndrew an overview of the work on building an evidence hub that helps share evidence and provide a map of activity in OER.

Cathy Casserly: 

Steps on the timeline:

1998: Open content, 99 Connexions, 2000 MIT OCW, 2001 Wikipedia, 2002 Hewlett, Creative Commons, Open Learning Initiative, UNESCO (first use of the term OER), 2005 TESSA, 2006 Khan Academy, 2007 Cape Town OE Declaration, 2008 OCWC, Flat World, 2009 Open High School Utah, 2011 Department of Labor call 4x$500m everything must be CC-BY.

As well as this history there is evidence that OER is becoming more accepted, while there remains things to be done: Platforms for resources need integrating – including iTunesU which needs to properly support Creative Commons licensing. There are many positive actions in progress: Google and Bing adding the CC licence to search; OECD working on policy for adoption of OER; New funders coming in. 

As the new CEO of Creative Commons, Cathy taking time to assess their next steps, but Creative commons is clearly now thinking about this space – and the way that CC can power OER.

A cycle where OER -> Data -> Theory then back to OER has always been part of the vision, growing participation offers the driver for this cycle.

Mike Smith: 

Use is the focus. Working on a  report with Brooking. Need insights into how IT can be used in developing world. OER is an important catalyst and component. Lesson don’t start with technology; start with imagination. Develop guidelines for use and enable sharing and take up.

OER use will track IT use in the developing world. The exception is openness – but data is missing of effectiveness. But as open helps spread and use it is clear that OER can be just as effective as non-OER AND can be more easily adapted.

Mike identified 6 drivers for OER to be used:

1: Access infrastructure: Broadband, platforms, speed of uptake, ease of finding quality.

2: Market conditions: Prices down, supply up, hardware, tools – cloud, open source, kids as experts, NGOs that can support

3: Choice for use of technology – that is useful: Simple, easy, reliable technology to which OER adds free and ease of adaptation.

4: Cultural fit: An open approach offers neither disrespect or threat

5: Add value(?): Creates new access – OER opens locked boxes. BUT need to understand how to show effectiveness – need big effects. Meta-analysis is ok for IT use supported by OER. Teacher v computer (no significant difference is a positive effect). Not the same for teacher v teacher + technology (no difference is negative!). 

6: Networks – the future(?): Models for Education + OER (TESSA/P2PU). Collective action. 

First rule – don’t start with technology, start with the problem.

 

  • Eg: classrooms in Nairobi slums. New projector +USB + crank powered. USB can have OER. NGO support and get take up.
  • Eg: postsecondary wants to upgrade knowledge infrastructure to western level – intranet to internet. Focus on the open. Across all aspects.

 

Mike’s summary offered elements of possible guidelines:

 

  • Start with problem, offer the right technical infrastructure, build in the social elements, ensure you add value.

 

The time is right for OCWC to offer OER to the world– create an OER Store – select what you need. 

Patrick McAndrew: (slides from this talk embedded below)

Showed a quick run through examples of mapping discussed with Cathy Casserly during her time as an OLnet Fellow before showing how at the OER meeting in San Franciscon initial claims and evidence/counter-evidence had been gathered in a “claims-garden”. At http://ci.olnet.org an evidence hub is being constructed with seeding from this exercise and from analysis of project reports. The next stage is to add more evidence and links to their sources and move towards an open process for adding and refining the evidence.

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Mapping the OER Landscape

Mapping the OER Landscape

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