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Louise Morley Keynote - Imagining the Inclusive University of the Future

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John Rose-Adams
23 March 2012

Professor Louise Morley

University of Sussex, UK

Abstract

Higher education today is characterised by the hyper-modernisation of global, entrepreneurial, corporate universities and speeded up, nomadic public intellectuals. This is often underpinned by the archaism of globalised vectors of gender inequalities and elitist participation patterns. Change has been rapid and extreme. Public and private boundaries are less distinct and the value of higher education is in flux, with the policy logic of the knowledge economy challenged by the global economic recession. Counter hegemonic advocates did not necessarily predict the scale of neo-liberal/ neo-conservative driven change, and more recent austerity measures. Traditionalists did not foresee the industrialisation and massification of higher education. The academic imaginary has often been harnessed to compliance, critique, and more recently, to survival. There have been limited opportunities to engage in futurology. Desire, as well as loss and threats, needs to be considered. Questions about the morphology of the university of the future seem to be eclipsed by pressing concerns in the present. What should the university of the future look like?

The speaker

Louise Morley AcSS is a Professor of Education and Director of the Centre for Higher Education and Equity Research (CHEER) (http://www.sussex.ac.uk/cheer/) at the University of Sussex, UK. She is an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences and a Fellow of the Society for Research into Higher Education.

Louise has an international profile in the field of sociology of higher education studies. Her research and publication interests focus on international higher education policy, gender, equity, micropolitics, quality, and power. She has recently directed an ESRC/DFID funded research project on Widening Participation in Higher Education in Ghana and Tanzania (www.sussex.ac.uk/education/cheer/wphegt). Her publications include Gender Equity in Selected Commonwealth Universities Research Report No. 65, DFID (2006); Quality and Power in Higher Education  (2003) Open University Press; Organising Feminisms: The Micropolitics of The Academy (1999), Macmillan. 

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