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Background & Theme

Cloud created by:

Ilona Buchem
6 May 2014

Internationally, there is a growing body of research related to mobile learning dedicated to the design, implementation and evaluation of mobile learning tools and scenarios (Buchem et al., 2011; Jahnke, 2011; Herrmann, 2009). However, whilst some studies within the socio-cultural framework address important aspects such as user-generated contexts (Pachler et al., 2010), ownership and changed power relations (Traxler, 2011), the role of mobile learning for fostering creativity is still an under-explored and under-researched area. As such, the relationship between mobile learning and creativity is ambiguous and in need of attention.

In our Special Issue of IJMBL in 2013 (Buchem, Jahnke, & Pachler, 2013) we aimed to contribute to this developing area of knowledge and practice while locating mobile learning within a socio-culturally orientated approach proposed by Pachler, Bachmair and Cook (2010).The papers contribute particularly to the role of mobile learning for fostering creativity. They explore the relationship between learning and creativity in different contexts (for instance, formal education, workplace learning, informal learning), and analyze ways in which mobile media and methods applied to in the design of mobile learning may – or may not – foster creative learning. The contributions show, however, that research on the design of mobile learning to foster creativity is still in its infancy. Further studies need to take a more analytic approach, examining in more detail how mobile learning can support teaching for creativity, creative teaching and creative learning. The contributions show, however, that research on the design of mobile learning to foster creativity is still in its infancy. Further studies need to take a more analytic approach, examining in more detail how mobile learning can support teaching for creativity, creative teaching and creative learning, allowing us to arrive at a next level answer to the question “How to design learning to be creative when the answer to the problem is not yet known?” (Fischer, 2011).

Creativity is becoming the new value and norm for a modern society and is vital to our survival, crucial for scientific innovation, social, cultural and economic progress. Already today many of the fastest-growing jobs and emerging industries rely on creative capacity, such as the ability to think unconventionally, inventing new scenarios and producing novel solutions. How can new technologies, including mobile and wearable technologies, be designed and applied to enhance creative learning and teaching? Which innovative pedagogical approaches to using mobile and wearable technologies can foster creativity in learning and teaching? As there is a gap between creative mobile pedagogies and innovative mobile technologies, it is important to bring both sides together to embed creativity into the TEL agenda.

The CMLT14 workshop is based on the belief that mobile and wearable technologies combined with innovative pedagogies have the potential to foster creativity, which may take different forms, including everyday creativity, scientific creativity and social activity. The key question emerging is how mobile and wearable technologies can be designed and applied to enhance creative mobile learning and teaching in academic, scientific, work-based, social or everyday settings. This workshop focuses on identifying innovative approaches, practices, designs and developments harnessing the potential of mobile and wearable technologies to enhance creative learning and teaching.

References

Buchem, I., Cochrane, T., Gordon, A., & Keegan, H. (2012). M-Learning 2.0: The potential and challenges of collaborative mobile learning in participatory curriculum development. In Proceedings of the IADIS Mobile Learning Conference 2012, Berlin, Germany.

Buchem, I., Jahnke, I. & Pachler, N. (eds. 2013). Guest editorial preface. In. Special Issue on Mobile Learning and Creativity: Current Concepts and Studies. In. International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning. July-Sept 2013, Vol 5., No. 3.

Fischer, G. (2011). Understanding, fostering, and supporting cultures of participation. Interactions (New York, N.Y.), XVIII(3), 42–53. doi:10.1145/1962438.1962450

Florida, R. (2002). The rise of the creative class: And how it’s transforming work, leisure, community and everyday life. New York, NY: Perseus Book Group.

Gauntlett, D. (2011). Making is connecting. The social meaning of creativity from DYI and knitting to YouTube and Web 2.0. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.

Goggins, S., Jahnke, I., & Wulf, V. (Eds.). (2013).Computer-supported collaborative learning at the workplace. Forword by John Seely Brown. New York, NY: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-1-4614-1740-8

Herrmann, T. (2009). Design heuristics for computer supported collaborative creativity. Proceedings of HICSS, 2009, 1–10.

Jahnke, I. (2011). How to foster creativity in technology enhanced learning. In B. White, I. King, & P. Tsang (Eds.), Social media tools and platforms in learning environments: Present and future (pp. 95–116). New York, NY: Springer. Doi:10.1007/978- 3-642-20392-3_6

Pachler, N., Bachmair, B., & Cook, J. (2010). Mobile learning: Structures, agency, practices. New York, NY: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-1-4419-0585-7

Sternberg, R. J. (1999). Handbook of creativity. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Traxler, J. (2011). Context in a wider context. Medienpädagogik. Mobile Learning in Widening Contexts: Concepts and Cases, 19.

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