The web-site is now in readonly mode. Login and registration are disabled. (28 June 2019)

Meiramgul Tleulinova, Almaty Technological University

Cloud created by:

Daniyar Sapargaliyev
29 January 2015

Since the start of the new century, mobile technologies have been showing how learning in universities can be transformed. We have seen an incredible variety of projects and pilots in the universities of Western Europe, Asia Pacific and North America and outliers in South Africa, Australasia and elsewhere. They have covered every discipline and every pedagogic approach, taking university education to people and communities otherwise beyond the reach of traditional interventions and enriching university education by making it more authentic, spontaneous, situated, contextual and personalised. These were pilots and projects often originally driven by the perceived challenges, experiences, paradigms and theorising of learning with computer technology but handicapped by problems of scale, sustainability, evidence, equity and embedding. More recently, these various factors have been displaced by the transformation of mobile technologies from being scarce, fragile, expensive and difficult to being cheap, robust, easy and universal whilst computer technologies in education have remained institutional and conservative. University students' perceptions of using mobile technologies for learning are not shaped by any earlier generations' experience of using computer technologies for learning but are now predominantly shaped by their continuous of informal, social, cultural, financial and recreational use of mobile technologies before, after and during their time at university.

A major challenge in the research is the inability to keep up with technology. While much of the research that exists reports positive outcomes, technology is advancing so quickly that we have yet to understand the educational possibilities of advanced mobile devices like smart phones, the use of personal mobile devices for education, informal learning that currently exists in the classroom, and the results of full-scale initiatives or longitudinal studies.

“There are still significant challenges of scale, sustainability, inclusion and equity in all their different forms in the future, and of context and personalization in all their possibilities, of blending with other established and emerging educational technologies and of tracking the changes in technology”.

A major challenge in the research is the inability to keep up with technology. While much of the research that exists reports positive outcomes, technology is advancing so quickly that we have yet to understand the educational possibilities of advanced mobile devices like smart phones, the use of personal mobile devices for education, informal learning that currently exists in the classroom, and the results of full-scale initiatives or longitudinal studies.  “There are still significant challenges of scale, sustainability, inclusion and equity in all their different forms in the future, and of context and personalization in all their possibilities, of blending with other established and emerging educational technologies and of tracking the changes in technology”.

While mobile access is high in developed and developing countries alike, the types of devices being used and the infrastructure surrounding these devices are often drastically different, as are the educational needs and gaps that can be addressed with technology. Approaching mobile learning from a global perspective can be hazardous, because different regions and communities require different interventions which reflect and account for local and cultural idiosyncrasies. Additionally, mobile learning often relies on the availability of high-quality content. Though significant advancements are expected in translation technology, the current of dearth local language content, such as video and mobile apps, is likely to remain an issue.

One of the strongest barriers to the development of mobile learning is the lack of trained practitioners who can effectively incorporate mobile technologies into their classroom practice. Current teachers, as well as those entering the profession, need training and professional development in the innovative design of mobile learning interventions. We should develop strategies to support teachers in deepening their understandings of the complex relationships between mobile technology, pedagogy, design and implementation.

It is important to consider these questions and others rose in this report, because the decisions today will determine what mobile learning looks like tomorrow. With clear and well-informed strategies in place, mobile learning can and will make positive contributions to teaching and learning and help increase educational access, equity and quality for all.

Extra content

Embedded Content

Contribute